Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Antlers, OK

Find local Antlers, Oklahoma florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Antlers and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Antlers Flower Shops

Vintage Lane Flowers & Gifts

408 W Main St
Antlers, OK 74523
(580) 298-9811

Antlers OK News

Jun 29, 2017

DAVIS COLUMN: Fruits from flowers faithfully forming

Bucks continue to put on antler growth and are beginning to congregate small bachelor groups. Flies continue to meet on deer’s faces, ears and antlers.Poison ivy is beginning to flower, but bees don’t seem to mind gathering pollen in these places. Evidence suggests the awful urushiol does not make its way into honey.Black locust trees are coloring some forests and pastures white with fragrant blooms. Tuliptrees, a popular landscape tree, is now blossoming, too, attracting numerous pollinators for its copious pollen and nectar. This tulip poplar is the state tree of Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee, and does grow well in southern Wisconsin.Timber rattlesnakes near Spring Green are active seeking sunning locations, particularly the gravid females who give birth to live young (not eggs) later this summer.Young eagles are showing signs of limbing and wing exercising and should fledge by month’s end.Keep a close eye on nature’s summer progresses, so as not to miss an important clue or event. (WiscNews)

Mar 16, 2017

For more than 40 years, pair have tended a love for flowers in The Little Greenhouse

Staghorn ferns that mimic mounted antlers cause their share of double-takes, as do moth orchids cascading seductively from their pots.Want an orchid that's nearly black, or one so tiny that four blooms could fit on the tip of a pencil eraser? No problem. Bromeliads, ferns, begonias — if you can name it, it's there.This is an especially busy time of year for Carney greenhouse co-owners Thomas McBride and Gary Krause, who oversee a space teeming with 30,000 plants that's been 42 years in the making.They are preparing to sell a wide variety of their living wares on the second weekend of the Maryland Home & Garden Show, which will take place March 10 through March 12 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, in Timonium. They also take part in the annual Garden Festival, to be held May 6 at Ladew Topiary Gardens, in Monkton.But despite the extra work, the partners in business and life continue to tirelessly share growing tips and plant trivia with all comers, as usual.Laura Sobelman, a member of the Maryland Orchid Society, to which McBride and Krause belong, said a "transfer of enthusiasm" occurs when the owners interact with their customers."Tom and Gary go out of their way to teach other people, whether they're novices or expert growers," she said. "It's a magical place."McBride said he was smitten with what seemed to be an alternate botanical universe the first time he entered the greenhouse in 1973 and, though he's now ... (Baltimore Sun)

Dec 8, 2016

Holiday events light up Delaware this weekend and beyond

Sharp Hall, University of Delaware, 23 S. Main St., Newark. Free. David Herman at the organ for a sing-along. Santa Crawl 8 p.m. Expect reindeer antlers and Santa hats to be the norm when bar crawlers hop on buses and make their way around to 14 bars and restaurants for the annual loop celebrating the season. Throw on your best bad holiday sweater or Santa hat for free admission to the loop; otherwise it’s a $5 cover charge. Participating venues are Anejo, Catherine Rooney’s, Chelsea Tavern, Dead Presidents, Ernest & Scott, FireStone, Gallucio’s Cafe, Grotto Pizza, Kelly’s Logan House, Lavish, Timothy’s Riverfront, Trolley Oyster House, Trolley Tap House and 8th & Union Kitchen. For more information, visit outandaboutnow.com/santa-crawl/. The Reminders 7 p.m. Crossroad Community Church, Georgetown. Holiday concert by the Americana-gospel trio. “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” 8 p.m. Kent County Theatre Guild, 140 E. Roosevelt Ave., Dover. Free-$18. Also 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tree Lighting 6-9 p.m. Glasgow Regional Park, U.S. 40 and Del. 896, Newark. Music, refreshments, crafts, vendors and photos with Santa. Tree lighting at 7. “Welcome to Castlewood” 7-9 p.m. Cornerstone Church, 761 S. Little Creek Road, Dover. Free. Annual original Christmas musical. Also 7 p.m. Saturday and 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday. Saturday, Dec. 10 “A Christmas Carol” 8 p.m. Delaware City Library, 250 Fifth St., Delaware City. Reedy Point Players production. Also 2 p.m. Sunday. “A Christmas Carol” 8 p.m. Delaware Theatre Company, 200 Water St., Wilmington. Through Dec. 30. “A Gilbert & Sullivan Christmas Carol” 2 and 8 p.m. Arden Gild Hall, 2126 The Highway, Arden. Charles Dickens’ plot and Arthur Sullivan’s music, with words by Gayden Wren and W.S. Gilbert. Also 8 p.m. Dec. 16, 8 p.m. Dec. 17 and 2 p.m. Dec. 18. “A Little Princess” 8 p.m. Wilmington Drama League, 10 W. Lea Blvd., Wilmington. $12-$20. Also 8 p.m. Dec. 16, 22, 23 and 30 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17, 18 and 28. Appoquinimink High SchoolCraft Fair 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Appoquinimink High School, 1080 Bunker Hill Road, Middletown. 175 local vendors with works of art and craftsmanship, food and clothing. Lunch from the school culinary arts department and a visit from Santa 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Breakfast with Santa 9 a.m.-noon St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1301 N. Broom St., Wilmington. $4-7, plus non-perishable food for food pantry. Crafts, games, shopping and photos with Santa. Breakfast with Santa 9-10 a.m. Brandywine Zoo, 1001 N. Park Drive, Wilmington. $12-$18. Registration required at www.brandywinezoo.org/special-events.html. Photos with Santa, making decorations and animal e... (The News Journal)

Nov 18, 2016

Favorite trees, shrubs, vines for local gardeners

Most of these plants are on display at the Cattail Crossing Xeriscape Demonstration Garden. Come, take a stroll and see how many you can find. Plant lists are available by the Giant Sacaton grass. Or look them up online for more information. We hope you have discovered some new favorites for your garden. Maureen Van Ness is a Colorado Master Gardener and a volunteer member of The Pueblo West Xeriscape Gardeners at Cattail Crossing, now on Facebook. Or, contact The Gardeners at cattailgardeners@gmail.com. (Pueblo West View)

Oct 21, 2016

A Garden Sanctuary of Medieval Magic

Plantings are intensely romantic and English, but not in the mixed-border “cottage” style pursued by, say, Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst (arguably England’s most famous garden). Instead, the Bannermans rely on demonstrative and dramatic flowers, planted en masse for theatrical effect: shrub roses and rambling roses, huge petaled peonies, exotic echiums and fragrant lilies — scent is vital to their style — in terra-cotta pots on terraces.Last and definitely not least: The Bannermans also happen to be great company at dinner, which is, for this crowd, as essential as horticultural prowess.In moving to Trematon in January 2012, the couple were, in fact, downsizing. Their previous home, Hanham Court, near Bath, is a large medieval ensemble complete with church, tithe barn and huge manor house, where over some 20 years they raised their three sons and created one of the most acclaimed new gardens in Britain. Filled with their signatures — including green-oak garden buildings, root-houses and obelisks — it also showcased a softer side, with scores of roses and flowering shrubs, all blossoming in wild profusion as if by happenstance.The Bannermans were unfazed by the duchy’s insistence on a lease: “It is endlessly renewable,” Isabel says. They had, in fact, toyed with the idea of leasing the property when it had come up for sale before, and this time they succumbed to the “madness.” As with so many migrants to Cornwall, it was the quality of light that ultimately seduced them. “There are very few places, even in Cornwall, that have Celtic-Irish estuary light along with the amazing architecture,” Isabel says. “It’s a very outgoing castle where most castles are not,” Julian adds. As if to highlight that, one of their first acts was to place a pair of green-oak cannons on the lawn, pointing directly out to sea.And then, according to Isabel, soon after settling in, it rained for a full 12 months. She did her best to establish new plantings, importing about 200 tons of topsoil, and Julian spent a lot of time clearing the mount of the invasive weed petasites, to the detriment of his knees. With perseverance, and better weather, they gradually gained the upper hand. Julian’s mount began to harbor the wildflowers they had dreamed of, and all around the house trees and bushes began to bloom and bear fruit.Trematon in their hands has become a Victorian fantasy of King Arthur’s court, where knights would pursue maidens under flowery bowers and lush meadows — an atmosphere familiar from 19th-century Pre-Raphaelite paintings. Julian and Isabel reference the work of Victorian painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema, who took “a Hollywood version of the Roman world” as his setting and exploited its reputation for decadence. His most famous painting dramatizes the apocryphal moment the emperor Heliogabalus murders his dinner guests by smothering them with rose petals. The Bannermans similarly (at least metaphorically) want to drown their guests in roses, those most Victorian of flowers. But the essential atmosphere is medieval. “You can’t fight that,” Julian says.The main entrance of the Regency house is on the side facing away from the sea. When the Bannermans came, it was simply bare lawn and gravel for parking. They added great arcs of planting beds on the terraces with a central set of steps leading up to a larger obelisk as a focal point (a plaque commemorates the day the Prince of ... (New York Times)

Sep 14, 2016

Beside the elk or bears, find the tasselflower brickellbush

Where I talked about antlers and horns and how they are different — antlers are branched and shed then regrown each year — the little wildflower grew along the edge of the pullout where people stopped to watch the elk. Where I talked about grazing and browsing and how they indicate different kinds of eating habits — grazers eat nonwoody plant material and browsers eat woody plant material — the little wildflower grew among the bare branches of a fallen tree. Where I talked about bears' eating habits prior to hibernation — they stop eating for a week or two so they can eliminate all food waste before entering their winter dormancy — the little wildflower grew around the chokecherry clump where the three bears ate their fill. Advertisement Intrigued, I picked a stem with some leaves and flowers, brought it home and engaged the mystery plant that had so boldly presented itself to me. With lens in hand I examined the clustered five-petaled flowers colored like old piano keys. I noted other details then opened the book. Within minutes I knew the little wildflower to be tasselflower brickellbush, a member of the sunflower family. Sipping some Earl Grey, I allowed my memory to rummage its nooks and crannies for any recollection of having seen this plant before. It found nothing. I checked my catalog of all the Colorado plants I have found. It was not there. The books describe this plant as a common late summer wildflower that occurs over most of the state from the plains to the high mountains above treeline. M... (Loveland Reporter-Herald)