Birthday Flowers

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Posey Peddler

Order flowers and gifts from Posey Peddler located in Hicksville OH for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 109 East High Street, Hicksville Ohio 43526 Zip. The phone number is (419) 542-7153. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Posey Peddler in Hicksville OH. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Posey Peddler delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Posey Peddler
Address:
109 East High Street
City:
Hicksville
State:
Ohio
Zip Code:
43526
Phone number:
(419) 542-7153
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Posey Peddler directions to 109 East High Street in Hicksville, OH (Zip 43526) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 41.2946929931641, -84.7594299316406 respectively.

Florists in Hicksville OH and Nearby Cities

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15026 State Road 1
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11755 County Rd D
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(15.02 Miles from Posey Peddler)

Flowers and Gifts News

Jun 2, 2017

King Kullen Expands Its Shop OnLine Delivery Service

Garden City, Garden City Park, Great Neck, Great Neck Estates, Great Neck Gardens, Great Neck Plaza, Greenvale, Harbor Hills, Hempstead, Herricks, Hicksville, Jericho, Kensington, Kings Point, Lake Success, Lakeville Estates, Little Neck, Manhasset, Manhasset Hills, Manor Haven, Mineola, Munsey Park, Muttontown, New Cassel, New Hyde Park, North Hills, North New Hyde Park, Old Westbury, Plainview, Plandome, Plandome Heights, Plandome Manor, Port Washington, Queens Village, Roslyn, Roslyn Harbor, Roslyn Heights, Russell Gardens, Saddle Rock, Saddle Rock Estates, Salisbury, Sands Point, Searingtown, South Hempstead, Syosset, Thomaston, Uniondale, Upper Brookville, Westbury, West Hills, Willison Park and Woodbury. The Island Park King Kullen delivers to Arverne, Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, Barnum Island, Bay Park, Bayswater, Cedarhurst, East Atlantic Beach, East Rockaway, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Freeport, Harbor Isle, Hewlett, Hewlett Bay Park, Hewlett Harbor, Hewlett Neck, Inwood, Island Park, Lawrence, Lido Beach, Long Beach, Lynbrook, Malverne, North Lynbrook, Oceanside, Point Lookout, Rockville Centre, Roosevelt, Saddle Ridge, South Valley Stream, Valley Stream, Wave Crest, Woodmere, Woodmere Park and Woodsburgh.Spending time on Fire Island this summer? King Kullen is delivering to Fire Island communities once again! Who wants to worry about hauling groceries across the ferry on top of everything else that needs to be packed for a week at the beach? Beach customers can shop for items they need, select a delivery timeslot, and pick groceries up from the dock of the community where they are staying. King Kullen delivers to the Bay Shore, Patchogue and Sayville Ferries. The Bay Shore ferry delivers to Atlantique, Dunewood, Fair Harbor, Kismet, Ocean Bay Park, Ocean Beach, Saltaire and Seaview. The Patchogue ferry delivers to Davis Park and Ocean Ridge. The Sayville ferry delivers to Cherry Grove and Fire Island Pines. Fire Island orders to be delivered Tuesday through Sunday must be placed by noon the day before delivery. Fire Island orders to be delivered on Monday must be placed by noon the Saturday before delivery. For a complete list of delivery locations, pickup and delivery schedules, fees and more information, visit King Kullen's Shop OnLine page at https://www.kingkullen.com/shoponline. About the Company:Headquartered in Bethpage, New York, King Kullen Grocery Co., Inc. is recognized by the Smithsonian Institution as America's first supermarket. Michael J. Cullen opened the doors of King Kullen in 1930. Today, four generations later, King Kullen is still family owned and operated. It remains a leader in the supermarket industry. From that very first store in 1930, King Kullen today operates 32 supermarkets and five Wild by Nature stores across Long Island. In addition to traditional grocery, King Kullen features a large catering and prepared foods department, freshly-baked breads and sweets, and healthy and organic areas, with pharmacies and online shopping in many stores as well.For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14382541.htm...

Jun 2, 2017

Obituary: William (Bill) K. Lane Jr., 72, of Easton

William K. Lane III, Regan Lane and her fiancé JD, and Thomas Lane, all of Easton, brothers Richard Lane (Joanne) of Hauppauge, NY and Robert Lane of Hicksville, NY, his mother, Virginia Lane of Happauge, NY, and several nieces and nephews.  Bill is predeceased by his sister, Virginia Lane. Friends and family are invited to greet the family on Sunday, May 14th from 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm in Lesko and Polke Funderal Home, 1209 Post Road, Fairfield.  Friends are invited to attend a Mass of Christian Burial on Monday May 15th at11:00 am at Notre Dame Church, 655 Morehouse Road, Easton. Entombment will follow in Saint John’s Cemetery in Norwalk, with full military honors.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Thomas Merton Center of Bridgeport, Notre Dame of Easton, or the National Rifle Association.  The Gregory F. Doyle Funeral Home is in care of arrangements.  To leave an online condolence, please visit www.gregoryfdoylefuneralhome.com— by the Family... (Easton Courier)

Mar 23, 2017

My Turn: Hicksville has changed since wartime childhood

I was 3 years old when we moved to Hicksville from the Lower East Side of New York City. My father was a baker; my mother left her job at Simplicity Patterns, and we rented the three-bedroom, two-story house on Richard Street, a block behind Broadway. The year was 1941 and my father found a job at Just-Rite Bakery on Broadway. My sister and brother were born in the mid-1940s.Dominating a whole block on Broadway was St. Ignatius Church, rectory, school and convent. Broadway was a two-lane avenue packed with stores on both sides including Heuttner’s and Larry’s department stores, Buster Brown Shoes, delicatessens, bakeries, stationery stores, hardware stores and banks. The Sweet Shop served ice cream at the counter, as did Scheiner’s Drugstore and Lindemann’s. Doctors, dentists and lawyers had offices above the stores. The surrounding farms fueled Hicksville’s economy at the time. Stores were open on Saturday nights when the farmers came to town to shop.Most PopularWorld War II began soon after we moved to Hicksville. My... (Newsday)

Sep 14, 2016

Remembrance, reflection 15 years after Sept. 11 attack

OK.” On Saturday, Gujral, her parents, her husband and their children gathered at the Gurdwara Guru Nanak Darbar, a Sikh temple in Hicksville, to mark the end of a three-day prayer ceremony in which all the verses in the holy book were recited nonstop by a team of readers. The recitations began Thursday, with Gujral’s parents in attendance. “In our religion, it brings the soul peace,” she said. “And it gives us our peace of mind, too.” Narula worked as a data processor at Cantor Fitzgerald. Mona, as she was known to friends and family, had been employed there for less than a year when the terrorist attack occurred. “I have two girls. I see her in them every day,” said Gujral, who is pregnant with her fourth child. “My son, his hugs are exactly the same as Mona’s hugs. When he hugs you, he forms that connection with you.” But among some family members, the grief still can provoke a range of responses. For Patti Ann Valerio of West Hempstead, the sorrow compels her to speak and read names at as many events as she can in honor of her brother, Matthew James Grzymalski. Grzymalski, 34, of New Hyde Park, and his girlfriend Kaleen Pezzuti, 28, of Fair Haven, New Jersey, were working together as bond brokers for Cantor Fitzgerald. Sometimes Valerio’s husband, Joe, a retired FDNY firefighter, attends the events, including the Nassau County remembrance, to support his wife. But most days, Valerio would rather not remember Sept. 11, 2001, at all. “I was down there at the time of 9/11. It wasn’t a nice day,” Valerio said. “It’s something that’s very difficult to go through every year.” Valerio, 55, was working in Manhattan that morning and was called to the scene. He arrived at 11 a.m., about a half-hour after the north tower collapsed. He can’t forget the rest of that day or talk much about it either. He prefers to avoid visiting Ground Zero, a pilgrimage his wife makes each year. In 15 years, the landscape looks different — the reflecting pools catch the sunlight, the names of the victims are beautifully etched on the panels surrounding the pools. But there’s another landscape in Valerio’s mind, too. “Sometimes I go down there to the memorial and it’s tough for me,” he said. “I look around and it’s so nice now, but I remember.” ... (Newsday)

Jul 5, 2016

Proud grandfather, veteran joins parade

In 1954, my parents bought our family home in Hicksville. Like most World War II veterans, my dad, Frank Portuese, joined the local Veterans of Foreign Wars group, the William M. Grouse Jr. Post No. 3211. When I was growing up, our family would set up folding chairs outside St. Ignatius Loyola Church and watch the Memorial Day Parade proceed along Route 107 in Hicksville. We’d ask Dad why he never marched with the other veterans. He served in the Army in France and England. My siblings and I knew Dad was wounded in World War II, but we never knew more than the fact that his injury prevented him from walking long distances. He didn’t like to talk about the war. Most Popular We reminded him that the post had a car that disabled veterans could ride in. He said that was for the men who were more seriously injured. Dad didn’t feel right taking a seat. When he was 65 in 1988, we told him as a senior citizen, he could ride in the car. “Nope,” he said, that was for the older men. CartoonsCartoons: Saluting our veteransDon't miss outSign... (Newsday)

Apr 22, 2016

Dan Hicks, influential Bay Area singer and band leader, dies at age 74

Original Recordings” in 1969, followed quickly by “Where’s The Money?” in 1971, “Striking It Rich” in 1972 and “Last Train to Hicksville” in 1973. Hicks disbanded the Hot Licks after the group’s fourth album and released what would be his last studio album for 22 years in 1978. But after fighting alcoholism and becoming sober, he revived his career at the turn of the century, when he went back on tour. In 2000, Hicks released “Beatin’ the Heat,” which received good reviews and had an all-star cast of guest spots, including Tom Waits, Elvis Costello, Rickie Lee Jones, Bette Midler and Brian Setzer. He entertained fans with a personality that friends and fellow musicians described as sardonic, sarcastic and deadpan. His lyrics could be humorous and wry. One of his better known songs, “How Can I Miss You When You Won’t Go Away?” describes a tortured romance. “I’ve talked to your mother and I’ve talked to your dad/ They say they’ve tried but it’s all in vain/ I’ve begged and I’ve pleaded, I’ve even got mad/ Now we must face it, you give me a pain/how can I miss you when you won’t go away?’’ David LaFlamme, who was an original violinist in the Hot Licks, said Hicks was a stubborn artist and his drinking could make him difficult to love, even for fans. One night in Houston during the mid-1970s, Hicks was playing a concert and rebuffed song requests from the crowd, playing only snippets of songs before stopping, LaFlamme recalled. The crowd got hostile and began throwing beer at him, forcing the club owner to have security remove Hicks from the performance hall, said LaFlamme. “He didn’t necessarily like being liked,” LaFlamme said. But Hicks was a tireless and dedicated musician, he added. “He worked too hard and put on too many shows. He was a guy who deeply cared for what he did,” LaFlamme said. “He just didn’t wear his heart on his sleeve.” ... (Santa Rosa Press Democrat)

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