Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Amherst, OH

Find local Amherst, Ohio florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Amherst and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Amherst Flower Shops

Amherst OH News

Jan 26, 2018

Between the Rows: Emily Dickinson's inspired world of poetry and flowers

Emily Dickinson was born into a prominent Amherst family, so everyone knew who she was. She attended the Amherst Academy and went on to the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (as Mount Holyoke College was called at the time) for a period before she went back home to garden and write poetry. She was more known for her gardening than her poetry in those days; now she is more known for her poetry and her reclusiveness than her gardening. In the spring of 2010, both sides of her were showcased at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) exhibit titled Emily Dickinson’s Garden — The Poetry of Flowers. This exhibit presented Emily Dickinson as gardener and botanist as well as a poet, and the ways her observations of nature and love of flowers fed her poetry. The original garden was no longer in existence at the time of this exhibit, but research and a close reading of her poems were the basis for recreating the gardens around the Dickinson house. The exhibit also included a conservatory, a reminder of the small conservatory Emily’s father Ed... (The Recorder)

May 25, 2017

Chestnut Hill's Home & Garden Festival celebrates 21

Besides the Philadelphia area, they come from locations such as Brooklyn, NY; Rehoboth Beach, DE; Fletcher, NC; Amherst, MA, and Tampa, FL.Look for interesting variety in vendors and their wares. For instance, Nick Gomez, of Chestnut Hill, will have skateboards; Megan Fitzpatrick, of Wyndmoor, and Charles Todd, of Mt. Airy, will be displaying furniture, and Dana Rapoport, also of Mt. Airy, will feature children’s books.For honey lovers, the Philadelphia Bee Association will have a display featuring, of course bees, and a look at how these busy critters make honey.“A number of farms will be participating, bringing fresh food and vegetables for purchase,” said Miller. As usual, there will be numerous gardeners will beautiful plants and flowers, perhaps even orchids, for sale.Returning this year will be Eco Alley, sponsored by PECO Smart Ideas, featuring vendors offering sustainable products from organic plants. This display is courtesy of GRINCH (Green in Chestnut Hill).If you are bringing youngsters, be assured there will be plenty to do. There will be all day amusement rides at 8340 Germantown Ave.; arts and crafts all day in the 8300 block of Germantown Ave., and face painting all day at Germantown Avenue and Gravers Lane. The Manatawna 4H Club Petting Zoo will be open from noon to 4 p.m. at Bethlehem Pike and Germantown Avenue. The popular little train rides will be available from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the 8100 block of Germantown Avenue.A daylong festival like this always has plenty of music and food.Soul City will perform from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the 8600 block of Germantown Avenue; Rich Posmontier Ensemble will follow from 2 to 5 p.m. in the 8600 block of Germantown Avenue; the Dukes of Destiny will play in the 8200 block of Germantown Avenue from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and be followed by City Rhythm Orchestra from 2 to 5 p.m.Plenty of delicious food will be available. Locations are as follows:8600 block of Germantown Avenue — McNally’s Outdoor Café, Cosimo’s Pizza Café, Mica, Thai Kuu, Tavern on the Hill, Banjara, Trade Winds, Osaka, Bredenbeck’s Ice Cream;8500 block of Germantown Avenue — Chestnut Hill Cheese Shop, Starbuck’s Coffee, Funnel Cakes & Smoothies;8400 block of Germantown Avenue —Weavers Way Co-op, Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant;8300 block of Germantown Avenue — Roller’s Express-o, Campbell’s Place, Fiesta Pizza, Old Fashioned Kettle Korn;8200 block of Germantown Avenue — Paris Bistro, Chestnut Hill Grill & Sidewalk Café, Green Soul, Poppy’s Café, King’s Garden, Night Kitchen Bakery, El Poquito, Cin Cin, the Fresh Market;8100 block of Germantown Avenue — Roller’s Restaurant at Flying Fish, Bredenbeck’s Bakery and Ice Cream Parlor... (Chestnut Hill Local)

Mar 16, 2017

8 tricks to make your cut flowers last longer

Sprite and 7-Up can prolong the life of your flowers, according to US scientists. Susan Han, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s plant, soil and insect science department, recommends a three-to-one ratio of water to soda, but with a couple of drops of bleach to stop bacteria from growing.[Read more: How to arrange flowers like a pro] 5. Clean the vase Bacteria is the biggest baddie when it comes to bouquets, so make sure you thoroughly clean out your vase before placing a new bunch in it. 6. Keep fruit away Michelle says: "Keep fresh flowers away from ripening fruit, it gives off a gas called ethylene and will cause your flowers to lose their longevity." 7. Pop a penny in You’re bound to find one down the back of the sofa – so next time you get given a bunch of flowers, drop a penny in the vase – the copper is thought to stop bacteria from growing. 8. Bleach them Sounds crazy, but Michelle explains: "Did you know that Gerberas are quite susceptible to bacteria. If you do not have suitable flower food you can use a tiny amount of household bleach in the water."Have you got any tips for boosting cut flowers? Tell us in the Comments section below. (BT.com)

Dec 2, 2016

Neighbors welcome you at Holiday House Tour

Home Decor, 169 Main St.; Beckonings, 221 Main St.; Glorious Possibilities, 257 Main St.; Frederick's Pastries, 109 Route 101A; Flower Outlet, 165 Amherst St.; and Anne's Country Flowers, 142 Lowell Road, Hudson. Tickets on event days will also be available at 90 Concord St. during tour hours only. (Nashua Telegraph)

Nov 18, 2016

Heron, Flowers find success in debuts

Minutemen beat UMass-Lowell, 90-76, on Friday night in Amherst, Mass. Flowers is one of six freshmen on the UMass roster. “I looked out there and at times there were four or five brand-new players, guys who had never stepped on the floor in a Minutemen uniform,” Kellogg told Masslive.com after the game. “But the spirit they had, the spirit that they want to play basketball and go compete, is a good spirit to have with a group and a team.” Flowers was 3-of-7 from the 3-point line and knocked down his only two free throws of the game. He was 3-of-11 overall from the floor. In the Minutemen’s second game, a 90-88 loss to Ole Miss, Flowers had no points and three rebounds while playing five minutes. UMass hosts Temple on Thursday night. Heron started for Auburn, playing 19 minutes in an 83-66 victory over North Florida on Friday night. He scored 10 points as the Tigers knocked down 13 shots from 3-point range. Two of those came off the left hand of Heron. Heron also had three rebounds and a pair of assists. Auburn clipped Georgia State, 83-65, on Monday night as part of the Cancun Challenge. The Tigers play Eastern Kentucky on Thursday night in the next round. Rough start: First-year Post University men’s coach Marc Kuntz and the rest of the Eagles had a tough opening weekend, dropping a pair of games at the Bentley Tip-Off Classic in Waltham, Mass., by a combined 47 points. Merrimack beat the Eagles, 80-61, in the opener Friday night. Host Bentley was slightly more rude in dumpin...

Nov 18, 2016

Carnivorous plants come to Court Square Theater

Crafted by a high school in Amherst County, Virginia, the largest Audrey II puppet takes five people to operate and weighs several hundred pounds. “I’m a director by trade,” Gulla said. “So I have my degree in this kind of stuff and I think that college students really add a lot to bringing new energy to what we have.”  The entire production team is composed of local residents. With actors from Eastern Mennonite University and JMU, both alumni and current students, this production combines young actors from both sides of the train tracks. The production’s stage manager, Rebecca Moreira, is a JMU freshman and took on a great part in the show’s many aspects, according to Gulla.  “The music is great as far as the story goes,” Meyers said. “You can’t be too serious of a person. There are a lot of lines in here that if you’re not paying attention you’ll miss the joke.”  Although the production is open to all theater-goers, Meyers believes that fans of comedy will especially love the show because of it’s subtle humor. “Whether you really follow theatrical productions as musical theater or you don’t, it’s a really entertaining show for anybody,” Meyers said.    Valley Playhouse prides itself on its strong connection with the Harrisonburg community. During the first run of “Little Shop of Horrors,” the production invited audience members to donate canned food as payment for the show, which will go to Blessed Sacrament Food Pantry. In addition, the production will have a pay-what-you-will performance to make the show accessible to everyone.   “We’re doing more than we’ve ever done before when it comes to community outreach and I think it’s really important to give back,” Gulla said.  Through these collaborations, the Valley Playhouse hopes to continue their positive relationship with the community.  Valley Playhouse wants, “to encourage the community to kind of stretch your creative genetics a little bit and get involved,” Arthur said.  Contact Teresa Cummings and Carrie Domenic at breezearts@gmail.com. (The Breeze)