Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Ohio, OH Florists

Find florist in Ohio state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Ohio city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Ohio Cities

Ohio State Featured Florists

Something New Florist, Inc.

4500 Boardman-Canfield Rd
Canfield, OH 44406

The Country Flower Shack

115 N Pleasant St
Georgetown, OH 45121

Wilkin Flower Shop

2718 Sunset Blvd
Steubenville, OH 43952

Chesterland/Concord Floral

12650 W Geauga Plaza Dr Ste 2
Chesterland, OH 44026

De Hoff Flowers & Greenhouses

3517 Beechwood Ave
Alliance, OH 44601

Ohio Flowers News

Nov 28, 2018

Seasonal Flowers for Fall and Winter - Columbus Monthly

If visions of sun-kissed peonies and peach-colored blooms dance in your head, Meacham and Kasey Conyers of Orchard Lane Flowers (another Central Ohio weddings mainstay, located in Clintonville) have suggestions for making floral selections that are right for the season, but still accomplish the look you're dreaming of. Instead of: Peonies Try: Dahlias Peonies were once only available for a short time in the spring. Now, thanks to Alaskan greenhouses, Meacham says, they're in-season again in mid to late summer. That doesn't mean fall and winter brides need to cut the incredibly popular peony out of their plans, but they should be prepared to pay a price. "Winter peonies are going to be extremely costly, as they are flown in to the U.S. from far-away farms in the Southern Hemisphere," Conyers says. "They aren't the most economical choice, but we can get them from other parts of the world if we need to." In-season peonies, Conyers says, should cost around $8 to $9 per stem. During the off-season you can expect to pay closer to $15 to $20 per stem. Meacham offers the similarly lush and bulbous dahlia as an alternative seasonal statement flower for fall. "The Café au Lait dahlia is especially beautiful for weddings," Mecham says, adding that they're available from local growers into October. This generous, dense bloom comes in other classic wedding colors-dusty peach, ivory, champagne and creamy pink-and has an elegant, ombre-like fade throughout its layered, geometric petals. Instead of: Strictly seasonal themes or color palettes Try: Blues, white-on-white, greens Why stick to a season at all? "Brides are having a lot of fun with their colors and breaking from the traditional ‘holiday' or ‘winter' colors," Conyers says. "They're doing what feels right for their wedding, even if it's not what you'd expect to see at that time of year." Blush pink, whites and heavy greens are still trending no matter what the weather, Meacham adds. Indeed, a good florist can make your wedding colors come to life no matter the season. "We're seeing a large range of colors and blooms being used in the winter," Conyers says. "We had a lot of fun this past winter with bright whites, crisp greens and a touch of blue." If you like the traditional red holiday color palette, consider adding some contemporary fullness to it, she says: Mix a touch of blush with bright and deep reds and a strong burgundy. White-on-white also makes a big impact, lending a high-end feel to...

Nov 15, 2018

Seasonal Flowers for Fall and Winter

If visions of sun-kissed peonies and peach-colored blooms dance in your head, Meacham and Kasey Conyers of Orchard Lane Flowers (another Central Ohio weddings mainstay, located in Clintonville) have suggestions for making floral selections that are right for the season, but still accomplish the look you're dreaming of. Instead of: Peonies Try: Dahlias Peonies were once only available for a short time in the spring. Now, thanks to Alaskan greenhouses, Meacham says, they're in-season again in mid to late summer. That doesn't mean fall and winter brides need to cut the incredibly popular peony out of their plans, but they should be prepared to pay a price. "Winter peonies are going to be extremely costly, as they are flown in to the U.S. from far-away farms in the Southern Hemisphere," Conyers says. "They aren't the most economical choice, but we can get them from other parts of the world if we need to." In-season peonies, Conyers says, should cost around $8 to $9 per stem. During the off-season you can expect to pay closer to $15 to $20 per stem. Meacham offers the similarly lush and bulbous dahlia as an alternative seasonal statement flower for fall. "The Café au Lait dahlia is especially beautiful for weddings," Mecham says, adding that they're available from local growers into October. This generous, dense bloom comes in other classic wedding colors-dusty peach, ivory, champagne and creamy pink-and has an elegant, ombre-like fade throughout its layered, geometric petals. Instead of: Strictly seasonal themes or color palettes Try: Blues, white-on-white, greens Why stick to a season at all? "Brides are having a lot of fun with their colors and breaking from the traditional ‘holiday' or ‘winter' colors," Conyers says. "They're doing what feels right for their wedding, even if it's not what you'd expect to see at that time of year." Blush pink, whites and heavy greens are still trending no matter what the weather, Meacham adds. Indeed, a good florist can make your wedding colors come to life no matter the season. "We're seeing a large range of colors and blooms being used in the winter," Conyers says. "We had a lot of fun this past winter with bright whites, crisp greens and a touch of blue." If you like the traditional red holiday color palette, consider adding some contemporary fullness to it, she says: Mix a touch of blush with bright and deep reds and a strong burgundy. White-on-white also makes a big impact, lending a high-end feel to a wi...

Oct 26, 2018

Plant Lovers' Almanac: Enjoy the leaves, flowers and fruits of fall

Witchhazel. Arguably witch hazels (Hamamelis) are the latest and earliest woody plants of our Ohio seasons, though our winter witch hazels are of different species. Now showing is Hamamelis virginiana, its soft yellow flowers combining with fall foliage.• Seven-son flower. The beauty of this large shrub or small tree (Heptacodium miconoides) is that its inflorescence lasts for several months. First come the cheery white petals for a few weeks, then after these fade, the sepals beneath them turn from green to salmon, lasting for up to two months. Sometimes you see both the petals and sepals occurring at once, as I did last week at Cornell University in New York.• Flowers out of season. Each year we see a few examples of this, from rhododendrons to crabapples. For October of this year I saw two wonderful yellow-flowering spring shrubs — forsythia and kerria — celebrating their March/April spring bloom early. As usual, only a few blooms popped out, so next year’s display will be fine without them. Unless winter is severe.• A sweet-smelling rose. There are a few roses still blooming out there and still time for you to complete one of a plant-lover’s greatest acts. When you see a flower, smell it. It is one of the odd things about being in an arboretum or garden giving a tour and having to remind everyone to step forward and inhale. Pachysandra is lovely; Callery pears are foul. Who knew? You can. And the yellow rose I smelled at Cornell the other day was exquisite.• Leav...

Oct 26, 2018

Wild Roses Foundation's 2-day dance workshop was knee-slappin' good time

Kids which, according to its website, "Supports child health-care research through The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital (in Ohio)." Because Smith also will participate in the upcoming Celebrity Bartender event for the local nonprofit Family Meals, a tip cup also was strategically placed at the sign-in desk. Rose Buds & Country Studs delivered many moments of celebration, but none as surprising as the marriage proposal by Ben Wilkinson to Wild Rose Foundation Board Secretary Katy Stalnaker. Stalnaker, who in 2013 survived a 28-day medically induced coma following a car accident that shattered her pelvis and caused a multitude of other injuries, can and will dance at her wedding as she said yes! ...

Oct 26, 2018

Ask a Master Gardener: Dry hydrangea flowers for color all winter long

Yes, you can still eat the apples. There's more information here: https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/plpath-fru-41.Written by U of M Extension Master Gardeners in St. Louis County. Send your questions to features@duluthnews.com.