Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center

Order flowers and gifts from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center located in Rye NY for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 280 Purchase St, Rye New York 10580 Zip. The phone number is (914) 967-2455. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center in Rye NY. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center
Address:
280 Purchase St
City:
Rye
State:
New York
Zip Code:
10580
Phone number:
(914) 967-2455
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center directions to 280 Purchase St in Rye, NY (Zip 10580 ) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 40.991791, -73.684448 respectively.

Florists in Rye NY and Nearby Cities

68 Purchase St Ste 1
Rye, NY 10580
(0.39 Miles from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center)
279 Halstead Ave
Harrison, NY 10528
(1.40 Miles from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center)
141 South Regent St
Port Chester, NY 10573
(1.60 Miles from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center)
231 Mamaroneck Ave
Mamaroneck, NY 10543
(3.07 Miles from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center)
1160 Mamaroneck Ave
White Plains, NY 10605
(3.12 Miles from Rockridge Flowers & Garden Center)

Flowers and Gifts News

Aug 22, 2019

Reap What They Sow At These Amazing Vancouver Hotel Rooftop Gardens - Forbes

Enjoy the ambiance as you order from the cocktail lab where incredibly unique drinks are made including the Candy Cap Magic, which features mushroom rye, vermouth, spiced maple, and comes served on a bed of forest moss!The Douglas, An Autograph Collection Hotel , VancouverThe DOUGLASJeremy Segal PhotographyThe Douglas, an autograph collection hotel and part of the huge Parq Vancouver complex features an enormous 30,000 square foot outdoor park on the sixth floor of the property. More than 200 native pines and 15,000 local plants grow here.There's also a water feature and a bike path in this urban park, which feels miles away from the city below.The eco-conscious Douglas hotel also promotes a "conserve together" program where a Douglas Fir tree is planted for every guest who opts out of the daily housekeeping service for two consecutive days. Nita Lake Lodge, WhistlerNita Lake Lodge Rooftop GardenFiona TappAlthough not located in Vancouver, the sumptuous Nita Lake Lodge is a nearby retreat to get away from the hubbub of busy city life. Located in charming Whistler village, just an hour and 40 minutes from town. Whistler is home to two mountains, that can be explored all year long. The Nita Lake Lodge has a pretty rooftop garden that is put to very good use by the onsite restaurants. Expect to find herbs, fruits and vegetables from the garden used across the property's three restaurants; Aura, Cure Lounge and Patio and Fix cafe. Try the rhubarb Collins, it's delicious!...

Aug 22, 2019

Blooming flowers at the Farmers Market - Record Herald

Margaret’s Memories (Sharon Fulkerson): aprons, towels and wash cloths, dryer balls, sock monkey hat, baby hats, blankets, market bag, felted bags, cell phone carrier. Persinger Produce & Cottage Foods (David Persinger and Julie Mosny): The Pie Lady will have local honey, assorted pies and other baked goods. Wood Designed by DW (Debbie Welch): Handmade, unusual wood crafts. Hand made crocheted dishtowels, clothes, potholders, pocket books and baby booties. Special orders welcome. Cookies, fudge. Your Other Mother’s Kitchen (Don & Sara Creamer): Artisan breads and bran muffin tops. Bridge View Garden (Hunter & Lorelle Rohrer): Mums and seasonal produce including red raspberries, cherry tomatoes, green beans and red potatoes. B.Y.E Gardens (Brian and Elaine Yoder): Tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, candy onions, bell peppers, green beans, melons, sweet corn. Baked goods, including cinnamon rolls, raspb...

Nov 28, 2018

Tropical Gardening: Brighten fall gardening with flowering plants, trees - Hawaii Tribune Herald

Waimea and Volcano. Some, such as the marigold, are great the year around. They are especially good for sunny dryer locations. The marigold is native to the Southwestern United States and Mexico. It grows well and is popular in every state and also in every civilized country of the world. When Cortez conquered ancient Mexico, he found marigolds growing there. The gorgeous golden marigolds were so beautiful that Cortez took seeds with him back to Spain. There, marigolds became the favorite flower of the devout to place at the altar of the Virgin Mary. Because of that, they were called Mary's gold and then became known as marigolds. Seeds of marigolds were taken to every civilized country of the world. They were so easy to grow and so beautiful, they grew popular everywhere. In India, marigolds are the favorite flower to put in lei to place around a person's neck to indicate friendship, and because of that they have become known as friendship flowers. Marigolds, zinnias, petunias and many other annuals with bright blooms are natural for adding color. You might also expand the beauty and interest of your floral borders by including low-maintenance foliage plants. What are some of the best to add color and texture contrast? Coleus immediately comes to mind and is probably the most popular. Little wonder, it's so versatile and vivid. The plants, with their brilliantly patterned leaves, are flashy in sun or shade. You will especially appreciate how coleus can transform problem shady spots into a rainbow of color. Use it to beautify areas along the north or east sides of your house, or garage or in containers on shady porches or patios, even under trees. Coleus also can take direct sun in cooler gardens. Coleus is just as much a favorite houseplant as it is a garden subject. They thrive in pots and are easy to propagate by cuttings. Other favorites include the many varieties of begonia, canna, caladium and geranium. Check out the vast array of seeds and bulbs available at garden shops. Other interesting plants you will want to consider are Euphorbia leucocephala, or snow on the mountain, and the many colors of poinsettia. A close relative of the Euphorbias, the Christmas poinsettia will soon be on the market, and early purchase can add color from November-March. You can sow seeds of such annuals in boxes, pots or outdoors. If you use some sort of container, make certain that drainage is good. You can sow the seeds in vermiculite, peat moss, sand or mixtures of these. You also can buy plants already started at several garden stores and nurseries in the area. If you start your own plants, water them, when seeds are in place, cover containers with a piece of glass or plastic and place in a protected location away from direct sunlight. In a few days, the seeds will germinate and more light will be needed to prevent leggy and poorly colored seedlings. ADVERTISING When the first pair of true leaves develop, it is time for transplanting. Set the tiny plants in pots or plant bands. Later, plant them outdoors in their permanent location. Using your creativity, you can brighten your home and garden from fall until spring. Share this story ...

Nov 28, 2018

Tropical Gardening: Brighten fall gardening with flowering plants, trees - Hawaii Tribune Herald

Waimea and Volcano. Some, such as the marigold, are great the year around. They are especially good for sunny dryer locations. The marigold is native to the Southwestern United States and Mexico. It grows well and is popular in every state and also in every civilized country of the world. When Cortez conquered ancient Mexico, he found marigolds growing there. The gorgeous golden marigolds were so beautiful that Cortez took seeds with him back to Spain. There, marigolds became the favorite flower of the devout to place at the altar of the Virgin Mary. Because of that, they were called Mary's gold and then became known as marigolds. Seeds of marigolds were taken to every civilized country of the world. They were so easy to grow and so beautiful, they grew popular everywhere. In India, marigolds are the favorite flower to put in lei to place around a person's neck to indicate friendship, and because of that they have become known as friendship flowers. Marigolds, zinnias, petunias and many other annuals with bright blooms are natural for adding color. You might also expand the beauty and interest of your floral borders by including low-maintenance foliage plants. What are some of the best to add color and texture contrast? Coleus immediately comes to mind and is probably the most popular. Little wonder, it's so versatile and vivid. The plants, with their brilliantly patterned leaves, are flashy in sun or shade. You will especially appreciate how coleus can transform problem shady spots into a rainbow of color. Use it to beautify areas along the north or east sides of your house, or garage or in containers on shady porches or patios, even under trees. Coleus also can take direct sun in cooler gardens. Coleus is just as much a favorite houseplant as it is a garden subject. They thrive in pots and are easy to propagate by cuttings. Other favorites include the many varieties of begonia, canna, caladium and geranium. Check out the vast array of seeds and bulbs available at garden shops. Other interesting plants you will want to consider are Euphorbia leucocephala, or snow on the mountain, and the many colors of poinsettia. A close relative of the Euphorbias, the Christmas poinsettia will soon be on the market, and early purchase can add color from November-March. You can sow seeds of such annuals in boxes, pots or outdoors. If you use some sort of container, make certain that drainage is good. You can sow the seeds in vermiculite, peat moss, sand or mixtures of these. You also can buy plants already started at several garden stores and nurseries in the area. If you start your own plants, water them, when seeds are in place, cover containers with a piece of glass or plastic and place in a protected location away from direct sunlight. In a few days, the seeds will germinate and more light will be needed to prevent leggy and poorly colored seedlings. ADVERTISING When the first pair of true leaves develop, it is time for transplanting. Set the tiny plants in pots or plant bands. Later, plant them outdoors in their permanent location. Using your creativity, you can brighten your home and garden from fall until spring. Share this story ...

Nov 15, 2018

Flowers & Bread: Seasonal items accent the lineup

On the weekends, cinnamon-raisin bread, semolina, sesame wreath and, occasionally, rye are added to the rotation. House-made jam, salted butter and Nutella always are available on the table. Another weekend treat: Chocolate rolls ($2 each) are filled with chunky chocolate and dusted with cocoa hearts on top. "We have a good time with bread," Lagrotteria said. onrestaurants@dispatch.com ...

Nov 15, 2018

Why a Canadian flower exporter is limiting growth in US

And it could change, warns Sui Sui, associate professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto's Ryerson University. She says that, while flowers growers who export shouldn't be affected by the agreement the way steel and aluminum industries will be, "there is some uncertainty around the negotiations. And there could be a trade war. There could be new tariffs." And in the flower business, there is a lot at stake. According to Export Development Canada, Canada's floriculture exports total $420-million annually. Story continues below advertisement Story continues below advertisement Jeffery's has one-million square feet of growing facilities, with two locations in the Niagara region – one in St. Catharines and another in nearby Jordan Station. "We're one of the bigger [greenhouses] says Mr. Gibson, adding that because of the company's proximity to the border, "we're the closest grower." But further expansion in the U.S. market is not in the cards. "We've had opportunities to expand in the U.S.," Mr. Gibson says. But he adds that further growth there has its risks – there are numerous competitors in the floriculture space south of the border. And profits have been solid with the export plan the company is currently following, he adds. Mr. Gibson says the company plans to focus on the expansion of its operations in Ontario. "We're hedging our risk," he says. "In Ontario we're a full-service supplier. We deliver the plants, we set up the displays, we control all of the sales. We have access to all of the sales data and we can see what's on hand, and what's sold." Regardless of what transpires south of the border in the coming months, Dr. Sui feels that for growers like Jeffrey's, there is more money to be made by looking farther afield. Her advice for skittish Canadian growers: "There are other markets, such as Asia, to export to," she says, adding that there might be demand for high-value flowers in these markets. "That's research they need to do. Diversification is a good thing." Hedging the risk Under Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) guidelines, all greenhouse-grown plants have to go through an inspection process before entering the United States to ensure they are not diseased. "It's a whole certification process that anybody who is going to export plants into the U.S. has to abide by," says Mr. Gibson. "It's a lot of paperwork and documentation of all your crops. You get audited by the CFIA a number of times during the year. But it's a part of doing business." Story continues below advertisement That labour-intensive process is set to improve. In 2016, the U.S.-Canada Greenhouse Certification Program was revamped to improve the consistency and effectiveness of the program. The idea was to encourage Canadian greenhouse plant exporters to grow their businesses in the United States.

Nov 15, 2018

Why a Canadian flower exporter is limiting growth in US

And it could change, warns Sui Sui, associate professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto's Ryerson University. She says that, while flowers growers who export shouldn't be affected by the agreement the way steel and aluminum industries will be, "there is some uncertainty around the negotiations. And there could be a trade war. There could be new tariffs." And in the flower business, there is a lot at stake. According to Export Development Canada, Canada's floriculture exports total $420-million annually. Story continues below advertisement Story continues below advertisement Jeffery's has one-million square feet of growing facilities, with two locations in the Niagara region – one in St. Catharines and another in nearby Jordan Station. "We're one of the bigger [greenhouses] says Mr. Gibson, adding that because of the company's proximity to the border, "we're the closest grower." But further expansion in the U.S. market is not in the cards. "We've had opportunities to expand in the U.S.," Mr. Gibson says. But he adds that further growth there has its risks – there are numerous competitors in the floriculture space south of the border. And profits have been solid with the export plan the company is currently following, he adds. Mr. Gibson says the company plans to focus on the expansion of its operations in Ontario. "We're hedging our risk," he says. "In Ontario we're a full-service supplier. We deliver the plants, we set up the displays, we control all of the sales. We have access to all of the sales data and we can see what's on hand, and what's sold." Regardless of what transpires south of the border in the coming months, Dr. Sui feels that for growers like Jeffrey's, there is more money to be made by looking farther afield. Her advice for skittish Canadian growers: "There are other markets, such as Asia, to export to," she says, adding that there might be demand for high-value flowers in these markets. "That's research they need to do. Diversification is a good thing." Hedging the risk Under Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) guidelines, all greenhouse-grown plants have to go through an inspection process before entering the United States to ensure they are not diseased. "It's a whole certification process that anybody who is going to export plants into the U.S. has to abide by," says Mr. Gibson. "It's a lot of paperwork and documentation of all your crops. You get audited by the CFIA a number of times during the year. But it's a part of doing business." Story continues below advertisement That labour-intensive process is set to improve. In 2016, the U.S.-Canada Greenhouse Certification Program was revamped to improve the consistency and effectiveness of the program. The idea was to encourage Canadian greenhouse plant exporters to grow their businesses in the United States.

Nov 15, 2018

Flowers & Bread: Seasonal items accent the lineup

On the weekends, cinnamon-raisin bread, semolina, sesame wreath and, occasionally, rye are added to the rotation. House-made jam, salted butter and Nutella always are available on the table. Another weekend treat: Chocolate rolls ($2 each) are filled with chunky chocolate and dusted with cocoa hearts on top. "We have a good time with bread," Lagrotteria said. onrestaurants@dispatch.com ...

Oct 26, 2018

Protea flowers a rare treat from down under

Hawaiian grown product with tremendous potential. Most proteas require cool climates on the dryer side like Waimea, Volcano, Upland West Hawaii and Maui. They prefer well drained soils. When grown in wet or humid locations, disease and pests become a problem. Even if you are not interested in growing proteas commercially, you can be certain that these gorgeous and exotic flowers are perfect to enhance your home, garden or a special, long lasting gift. If you receive some as a gift, remember that proteas have another advantage besides their remarkable attractiveness. They can be easily dried and enjoyed for a long time to come. All you have to do is remove the water from the container when the flowers start to lose their freshness and allow the flowers to dry into a permanent arrangement. Another method is to hang the flowers upside down for about a month, and then use them in a dry flower arrangement. To eliminate the possibility of mold setting in during drying, space the flowers out to allow a good circulation of air. This latter method is especially suited to types that have a tendency to bend over as they lose their freshness. ADVERTISING If you are not familiar with protea, ask your local florist to show you the various types now being produced, what each is called, and how long they will last. If you're looking for something special, proteas are worth checking out. Other long lasting floral gifts include dendrobium, cymbidium orchids, anthuriums, birds of paradise, heliconias and other flowering Hawaiian exotics. For further information on the protea family, contact your local UH College of Tropical Agriculture Extension Service office in Hilo or Kona. Several books are available like Sunset's Western Garden Book to give you tips on growing these amazing plants. Share this story ...

Oct 26, 2018

Protea flowers a rare treat from down under

Hawaiian grown product with tremendous potential. Most proteas require cool climates on the dryer side like Waimea, Volcano, Upland West Hawaii and Maui. They prefer well drained soils. When grown in wet or humid locations, disease and pests become a problem. Even if you are not interested in growing proteas commercially, you can be certain that these gorgeous and exotic flowers are perfect to enhance your home, garden or a special, long lasting gift. If you receive some as a gift, remember that proteas have another advantage besides their remarkable attractiveness. They can be easily dried and enjoyed for a long time to come. All you have to do is remove the water from the container when the flowers start to lose their freshness and allow the flowers to dry into a permanent arrangement. Another method is to hang the flowers upside down for about a month, and then use them in a dry flower arrangement. To eliminate the possibility of mold setting in during drying, space the flowers out to allow a good circulation of air. This latter method is especially suited to types that have a tendency to bend over as they lose their freshness. ADVERTISING If you are not familiar with protea, ask your local florist to show you the various types now being produced, what each is called, and how long they will last. If you're looking for something special, proteas are worth checking out. Other long lasting floral gifts include dendrobium, cymbidium orchids, anthuriums, birds of paradise, heliconias and other flowering Hawaiian exotics. For further information on the protea family, contact your local UH College of Tropical Agriculture Extension Service office in Hilo or Kona. Several books are available like Sunset's Western Garden Book to give you tips on growing these amazing plants. Share this story ...

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