Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

New Hampshire, NH Florists

Find florist in New Hampshire state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a New Hampshire city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

New Hampshire Cities

New Hampshire State Featured Florists

Tammi's Tulips & Gifts

12 Gray Fox Rd
Effingham, NH 03882

Allioops! Flowers & Gifts Llc

255 Newport Rd
New London, NH 03257

Prescott's Florist, Llc

23 Veterans Square
Laconia, NH 03246

Someday's Floral Design

20 1/2 River Rd
Allenstown, NH 03275

Tiger Lilies Floral Boutique

285 Calef Highway #14
Epping, NH 03042

New Hampshire Flowers News

Nov 9, 2019

Arlene's Flowers v. Washington - Cato Institute

And in Wooley v. Maynard (1977), the Court found that New Hampshire could not require drivers to display the state motto (“live free or die”) on their license plates. (That case is why, if your jurisdiction has a default slogan—for example, “taxation without representation” in D.C.—it has to offer you an alternative if you ask.) In a pair of 2018 cases, NIFLA v. Becerra, and Janus v. AFSCME, the Court found that states could not force a pro-life clinic to read a script advising patients on how to get an abortion, and that non-union members of a collective bargaining unit could not be forced to pay for union speech with which they disagree, respectively. The Court had the opportunity to tackle the issue of whether states may force wedding vendors to create cakes for same-sex weddings in Masterpiece. But the Court didn’t reach the issue of whether the First Amendment—speech or religion clauses—protects a refusal to provide a product or service for a particular occasion, if so how to draw the line between professions that are and aren’t sufficiently expressive to gain that protection, or any other major controversy that continues to roil lower courts. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote a concurrence offering some guidance, but post-Masterpiece state and circuit courts have diverged. As it has in previous stages of this litigation, Cato has filed an amicus brief supporting Arlene’s Flowers—again joined by Reason Foundation and Individual Rights Foundation—urging the Supreme Court to take up the case and settle these issues and ambiguities after all. Cato is the only organization in the country to have filed briefs in support of both Jim Obergefell (lead plaintiff in the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage case) and Jack Phillips (owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop). It shouldn’t be so hard to see the difference between government action and individual conscience, to have official equality while letting a thousand flowers bloom.

Sep 19, 2019

Bowery Flowers — The Green Spark Behind NYC's 1980s Bicycle Revival - Streetsblog New York

TA threw in with the messengers and led from behind. Carl died in June, in his house outside the somewhat isolated New Hampshire town of Danbury where he moved a decade or so ago, after finally accepting his landlord’s buy-out. This Saturday evening, Carl’s pals Bill DiPaola, George Bliss, Chris Flash, Pogo (Bill Weinberg) and I are holding a memorial celebration on the Lower East Side. Info here. Everyone is invited. As you can imagine, the run-up to the memorial has me pondering Carl and the past, with amazement and melancholy. A skilled photographer and compulsive documentarian, Carl was, as the saying goes, more comfortable behind the lens than in front of it. That was also true of his organizing. In the mid-eighties he saw that TA, where he’d been volunteering, was sputtering and due for a makeover … and pushed me for frontman, insisting I had straight cred he lacked. Plus, Carl had more going on than just reclaiming streets from cars: there was composting, recycling, utility bikes, community gardens, feminism, anti-apartheid divestment, veganism, interspecies-ism and hemp, for starters. All this while carrying the flame of his hipster-scholar grandfather, the jazz impresario and historian Rudi Blesh, who died in 1985 after years in Carl’s care. (My first time in that Fourth Street apartment, seeing cabinets bulging with Rudi’s ragtime 78’s, I blurted out an expression I’d heard on college radio: “Moldy Fig, eh?” Carl didn’t miss a beat: “My grandfather coined the phrase.”) “I was recruited into TA,” I later recounted in my Bicycle Uprising series, “by Carl Hultberg, a Green activist with one foot in utopian movements and the other in TA.” Visionary currents drawn from Gandhi and King and Lennon and Coltrane kept Carl buoyant as he grounded himself in the grit of birthing an ecological city: turning an Allen wrench at a TA bike-repair clinic, balancing a front-end-loader utility trike on a recycling run, sorting bottles and cans at his Village Green depot next to the West Fourth Street basketball courts. Carl was especially intent on fending off the Mayor Koch-era scapegoating of cyclists for the city’s traffic ills. That’s how we met — his NY Greens postcard ...

Oct 26, 2018

Dartmouth's stinky 'corpse flower' is set to bloom again

Kim DeLong, manager of the Life Sciences Greenhouse at Dartmouth. Morphy was grown from seed in 2003 by a private grower in New Hampshire and was acquired by Dartmouth in 2007. Each year, a corpse flower sends up either a leaf or a flower; each leaf lives for almost a year, whereas, a flower lives less than a week. Morphy has bloomed on two other occasions: in July 2011 and September 2016. It only had one leaf in between the two blooms, which stayed open for about 13 months and reached a height of 10 feet, nearly touching the greenhouse ceiling. During that time, the leaf was busy photosynthesizing and storing energy, as the plant must store energy to send up a flower. Once the leaf died in June, the Greenhouse repotted Morphy's corm or swollen underground tuber, which had an estimated weight of 80 to 90 pounds and took three people to lift. More information about the life cycle of the titan arum<http://my.chicagobotanic.org/life-cycle-of-the-titan-arum/> can be found in a diagram by the Chicago Botanic Garden. The Life Sciences Greenhouse at Dartmouth, which opened in 2011, is home to an extensive and varied plant collection. It includes the Brout Orchid Collection, which houses about a thousand orchids of many species and hybrids in two rooms. There are three other rooms open to the public: a tropical room, a sub-tropical room, and a xeric room housing cacti and succulents. The greenhouse is open to the public year-round and will have extended hours for viewing. The greenhouse is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., yet, visitors are encouraged to visit Morphy after 2 p.m., as parking options may be better later in the day. The extended greenhouse hours will be announced soon once Morphy begins to bloom. You can follow Morphy on Facebook<https://www.facebook.com/Dartmouthgreenhouse/>. ...

Oct 26, 2018

Dartmouth's ultra-stinky corpse flower is set to bloom again

Kim DeLong, manager of the Life Sciences Greenhouse at Dartmouth.Morphy was grown from seed in 2003 by a private grower in New Hampshire and was acquired by Dartmouth in 2007. Each year, a corpse flower sends up either a leaf or a flower; each leaf lives for almost a year, whereas, a flower lives less than a week. Morphy has bloomed on two other occasions: in July 2011 and September 2016. It only had one leaf in between the two blooms, which stayed open for about 13 months and reached a height of 10 feet, nearly touching the greenhouse ceiling. During that time, the leaf was busy photosynthesizing and storing energy, as the plant must store energy to send up a flower. Once the leaf died in June, the Greenhouse re-potted Morphy's corm or swollen underground tuber, which had an estimated weight of 80 to 90 pounds and took three people to lift.Here's the link to the live webcam of Morphy: dartmouth-greenhouse-h-264.click2stream.com.

Jun 14, 2018

Iris society show Saturday in Auburn

The show is co-chaired by Peter Young of Buckfield, the society's secretary, and Sue Labonville of Shelburne, New Hampshire. Other officers are Pauline Grenier of Minot, Harriet Robinson of Otisfield and Ted White of Minot. Club members will be available to answer the questions about growing irises. Advertisement ...