Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Asheville, NC

Find local Asheville, North Carolina florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Asheville and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Asheville Flower Shops

Kaylynne's Newbridge Florist

41 N Merrimon Ave Ste 105
Asheville, NC 28804
(828) 251-1899

Shady Grove Flowers

65 N Lexington Ave
Asheville, NC 28801
(828) 236-1713

Sibley's Florist & Gifts

1011 Tunnel Rd Ste 170
Asheville, NC 28805

Asheville NC News

Aug 17, 2018

Liz Cooper & The Stampede Debut Album 'Window Flowers' Receiving Rave Reviews

IL-Out of SPACE: Big Evanston Block Party August 28-Athens, GA-Georgia Theatre† August 29-Savannah, GA-B&D Beer Garden† August 30-Asheville, NC-The Orange Peel† August 31-Charlotte, NC-Neighborhood Theatre† September 1-Charleston, SC-Charleston Music Hall† September 9-St. Louis, MO-LouFest September 20-Nashville, TN-Musician's CornerNovember 8-New Orleans, LA-One Eyed Jacks‡ November 9-Austin, TX-Emo's‡ ...

Jul 6, 2018

Nature Journal: A look inside the mountain laurel flower

More: Tommy the tortoise called Asheville home for 22 years. Now, he needs your help In our temperate zone, hummingbirds and small mammals might assist in this regard, but the exchange is most often accomplished via the wind or by insects. The beautiful and highly individual sculpturing of a pollen grain's outer wall is a unique feature of each plant species - so much so, in fact, that scientists have been able to determine the presence or abundance of various species over time in specific place by separating pollen from cores of peat extracted from acidic bogs. The specific configuration of the pollen grains for many plants can be observed with a hand magnifier. You will be looking directly at one of the most beautiful and functional aspects of the natural world, and in the process you might be able to determine the manner in which the pollen grains are distributed. More: Nature Journal: Goldfinches soar with the grace of ballet dancers More: Nature Journal: How do crickets make that chirping sound? The familiar mountain laurel (Kalmia latiflora) is a case study in this regard. Almost a century ago, Herbert Waldron Faulkner provided an account in his "Mysteries of the Flowers" (Stokes, 1917). I have inserted some asides in brackets: "Each corolla [cluster of petals] is provided with a ring of twelve small pockets [invaginations], which gently hold the anthers and keep the filaments curved back in a state of tension, all round the central pistil. Thus the flower blooms, and thus it will remain unless some evening a night-moth, attracted by the white laurel blossoms and by their fragrance, arrives and reaching down for nectar disturbs the arrangement of the stamens. [Bumblebees are probably the major pollinator.] "A little touch will derange the equilibrium and one or several anthers will be released from their pockets; they will fly up with a quick snap, and their pollen will be thrown up forcibly against the moth's body and cling to his woolly covering. "And it should be noticed that if the moth brings pollen from another flower he is likely to leave some on the prominent stigma, while his body, at the moment of the explosion, acts as a bulwark to protect the pis...

Apr 13, 2017

Landscaping Camp To Feature Butterfly Gardening With Carson Ellis

Anne Heard Stokes Butterfly Garden.Before moving to Memphis in 2015, she interned at both the Asheville Arboretum and Highlands Biological Research Station in North Carolina and has an associate’s degree in Horticulture Technology from Haywood Community College as well as a BA in Environmental Science from Mount Holyoke College. Born and raised in the mountains of North Carolina, exploring the bottomlands and cypress swamps surrounding Memphis, Tennessee has been an exciting change of scenery. She loves nothing more than a good hike through Meeman-Shelby Forest State Park on the weekends, especially in the spring!“I enjoy working in the Butterfly Garden because I have a lot of creative freedom, independence to research and design the plantings and a strong sense of connection to the space,” Ellis said. “The work as a horticulturist is not always glamorous, but having the support to bring my ideas and vision to fruition has made it a rewarding venture. I am also excited to announce that in 2016, we were officially certified as a Monarch Waystation.”For more information on the Landscaping Camp, visit http://oxfordms.com/retire-in-oxford/landscaping-camp/ or contact Rosie Vassallo at 662-234-4651. For questions or comments, email hottytoddynews@gmail.com. (HottyToddy.com)

Mar 30, 2017

A shamrock bouquet of issues

Charlotte, Raleigh and Asheville.There’s more on the national scene, with health care being one example. On the campaign trail, we heard about health care for all and no one suffering from the Affordable Care Act’s repeal. Suddenly, we get a different story. Our leaders need reminding: Deeds, not words, make the man. Leaders should not make empty promises that tamper with people’s lives.The Congressional Budget Office says millions will lose their coverage. Congressional leaders say they will have access, but if you cannot work or pay the prices, what good is access? This issue impacts people who responsibly worked all their lives, get hit with serious illness and cannot afford to buy insurance. Hospitals are worried about returning to the days of picking up the cost of coverage for those who cannot pay. This problem is not one to solve in a huge hurry.The proposed budget is one big chopping block, tampering with items the public holds dear such as the arts, public radio and TV, elderly care and the environment. Congress refused to even meet Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, so despite that abysmal behavior everyone is expected to vote for the new Donald Trump nominee? What goes around comes around, they say.The House Intelligence Committee recently got two messages from the FBI: There’s no information that supports Trump’s allegation that Obama ordered surveillance of Trump Tower, and they are investigating whether the Trump campaign colluded with a covert Russian campaign to interfere with the U.S. presidential election. These are two chilling revelations. Certainly we all need to take care not to jump to conclusions until the facts come in, but there is potential here for a disgraceful moment in history.Remember 1973-74 as our country went through the Watergate hearings? Look at the film clips. Members of opposing parties conducted these hearings with more respect for each other than we presently see. We’ve lost our manners in politics. History has proven time and time again that our country functions best when there is division of powers and bipartisanship.Where does it all end, and what’s the average person to do? We can all hope for more bipartisan cooperation and less focus on revenge for opponents, whatever the issue might be. We still have our opinions, which can be expressed by writing letters and emails, making phone calls, marching, getting involved or even running for office. Abraham Lincoln called on all of us to ensure that “government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the Earth.”This column began with a memory from elementary school, so let’s end with Aesop’s fables. These stories came from a Greek writer who was a slave, and the messages still pack a lot of punch today. Each one had a life lesson: Sore losers are like sour grapes, don’t count your chickens before they hatch, and slow and steady wins the race. Don’t cry wolf when there is no wolf, because a liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth.Mary Garrison lives in Flat Rock. Reach her at mmrgarrison@gmail.com. (BlueRidgeNow.com)

Mar 23, 2017

Rosenthal Morris, Frances Childs

Brooklyn, N.Y.; her five grandsons, Elliot Leflar (Laura) of Charlottesville, Va., James Leflar III (Caroline) of LaGrange, Ill., David Leflar of Asheville, N.C., Edmund (Pete) Bentson (Jillian) of Summit, N.J., and Thomas S. Bentson (Anna) of Lynchburg, Va.; three great-grandsons, Charles, Andrew, and John Bentson of Summit, N.J., and two great-granddaughters, Eleanor and Ivy Leflar of LaGrange, Ill. The family expresses special thanks to all the staff at Westminster-Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, especially to those in the Health Center, 2nd floor, as well as to the loving and dedicated caretakers and companions from Home Instead. A brief memorial service will be held in the WCBR Chapel on Monday, March 27, 2017,at 11 a.m., with a reception to follow. Interment of the cremains will be held in the early summer at Fairview Cemetery, Westfield, N.J. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that memorial contributions be made to the Fellowship Fund at Westminster-Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, 250 Pantops Mountain Road, Charlottesville, VA 22911. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.hillandwood.com.#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }... (The Daily Progress)

Mar 16, 2017

The Most Beautiful Botanical Gardens In America : Top 5 ...

Currently, they have an orchid show up to March 26. Hurry and experience the flower fest!Biltmore House Gardens, Asheville, NC. Because spring is near, it's best to head to Biltmore House Gardens to see the azaleas and roses growing this year. Various tulip species begins to blooming in the Walled Garden and Estate Entry by the start of April. Flowering shrubs and trees, forsythia, spirea, magnolia, and flowering cherries can be seen throughout the estate. Take a walk around the property, Forest River, and meadows and bask in the great outdoors.Denver Botanic Gardens. This botanical garden has large landscape designs and greenhouses for various flower species growing there. It has a Japanese Garden integrating rock formations to create peaceful surroundings. They also have a Tropical Conservatory that has a trail and waterfall flowing down. You can find orchids or birds of paradise when walking along the road to the conservatory. If you want to gaze upon succulents or something dreamy like in the in the works of Shakespeare, then avail of the Midsummer Nights' tour of the garden. There are plenty of art exhibition in the vicinity, too.Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, PA. You can get to explore about 1,077 acres of the place from its children's gardens and formal flower blooms. Visit the Flower Garden Drive, Chimes Tower and Waterfall, and the Birdhouse for a unique view of the garden. You can find various hybrid flowers in the area, such as the Longwood Hybrid Cineraria. The best flowers to look out for are the Kohleria, Pride-of-Madeira, and the Dutch Crocus. Portland Japanese Garden. According to Travel and Leisure, the garden offers authentic Japanese-themed looks and integrates "bridges, pagodas, and an authentic teahouse that punctuate the landscape of native plants and Japanese imports." Spring is the best time to visit the garden, especially if you want to see cherry blossoms bloom in their prime. It was landscape architect Takuma Tono who brought Japan to Portland with his beautiful work. [embedded content]... (TravelersToday)