Birthday Flowers

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The Floral Studio

Order flowers and gifts from The Floral Studio located in Philadelphia MS for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 903 Holland Ave, Philadelphia Mississippi 39350 Zip. The phone number is (601) 656-6842. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about The Floral Studio in Philadelphia MS. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. The Floral Studio delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
The Floral Studio
Address:
903 Holland Ave
City:
Philadelphia
State:
Mississippi
Zip Code:
39350
Phone number:
(601) 656-6842
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find The Floral Studio directions to 903 Holland Ave in Philadelphia, MS (Zip 39350) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 32.759986, -89.105654 respectively.

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Flowers and Gifts News

May 31, 2019

Soggy planting season leaves growers dripping with concern - The Intelligencer

They seem to understand the weather patterns better than Doppler,” he said referring to radar.Last year was the second wettest recorded in Philadelphia and both the Farmers’ Almanac and the National Weather Service expect more of the same this growing season. That has farmers, gardeners and veterinarians anxious, as all the dampness isn’t healthy for plants and animals alike. “Right now, it definitely has been a wet spring. The ground is holding a lot of moisture,” Brunt said. “The fields are wet.”Master gardener Pauline Myers, with the Penn State Extension Service in Montgomery County, agrees. “It’s absolutely saturated,” she said of the soil. And with all the wet weather, the bees aren’t as busy pollinating the fruit trees and other plants that depend on them. “Bees don’t work in the rain.”Animals have also been affected. At the Doylestown Veterinary Hospital, Dr. Laura Weis said she’s seen about a dozen cases of leptospirosis this year, most likely because of the ground not drying out. The rare disease is spread in the urine of dogs and wild animals. Because it’s been so wet, dogs that come in contact with the urine of another animal can acquire the infection which affects their kidneys and can be fatal if not treated, she said.“We haven’t seen much of it until we’ve had this incredibly wet weather,” she said. A vaccination prevents the illness, but previously there wasn’t much need for dogs to be vaccinated. The vaccine costs about $20 to $25. The disease also can affect people but most of those cases are from swimming in ponds or other untreated waterways, she said. Farm animals such as sheep can ...

Apr 27, 2019

The language of flowers unveiled in the Moravian Archives | The NC Triad's altweekly - Triad City Beat

During his lifetime, he identified thousands of species of fungi in the region and would co-found the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Carl Linnaeus had introduced binomial nomenclature, the formal two-term scientific naming system in Species Plantarum, in 1753, the same year the Moravians settled in colonial North Carolina. Like their peers in Europe, the educated populace took to designating new species on long, leisurely walks, as evidenced in handwritten artifacts in the exhibit, which first analyzes Moravians’ relationship to flowers through the lens of natural history and botany studies. Flowers’ utility, too, mattered to the Moravians — the first known record of a planned garden with a plant list from 18th Century America is from this community — but communication and celebration traditions illuminate nuances of cultural norms. Part of exhibit display at the Archie K. Davis Center. (courtesy photo) Outside of symbolic language in autograph books and artwork, changes in Moravian birthday customs, in particular, offer unique insight. A 40-year survey of Maria Schaaf’s birthday cards evinces the comparatively formal designs favored by friends still living in Europe, in which ornate flowers encircle birthday wishes. While the earliest cards feature explicitly religious themes and scripture, an increasingly collegial tone emerges and focus shifts to the floral embellishments that adorn devotional verse numbers. On display nearby, a page in an unmarked book features a hand painting of a pink rose “embracing” a white one with its vine. This appealing artwork yields deeper meaning when placed in context of the Single Sisters House in the Salem community, built to provide single women and girls (who wore pink ribbons) and widows (who wore white) with housing and space for community service. “What more symbolic gesture of sisterhood than the younger woman, as a flower, putting her arm around the widow,” Elliott says. But the Moravians valued aesthetic beauty for simple pleasure’s sake, too, as revealed in old photographs and diaries. An early 19th Century diary of Susanna Elisabeth Kramsch is one artifact that illustrates each of these languages. “She would walk around the neighborhood picking up samples of flowers and she would write about them just as her husband did: scientifically,” Elliott says. “It was scientific knowledge mixed with a diary of all the terrible things happening in her life, particularly her husband Samuel’s ongoing illness. So w...

Apr 27, 2019

Column: My grandmother's rose blooms each Easter - Valley News

England. Wyck, a historic house in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, has what some consider to be “the oldest rose garden in original plan in America,” as its website describes it. Jane Bowne Haines, who lived at Wyck, introduced roses to the garden in 1824. The “Bella Donna” and “Beautiful Woman” roses were among those passed on through generations.Later immigrants who flooded into our country brought the roses they treasured along with them.Our rose started here. The patriarch of my family, Papou, came from Greece around 1910 as a boy with nothing — certainly not a flower. For work, he shined...

Mar 29, 2019

3/25, full issue: Environmental leadership, gun reform, spring flowers, more - Charleston Currents

At times, they even have to pay processors to take it away. Cantral Small towns in Florida have canceled entire curbside pick-up programs. Philadelphia now burns about half of its recyclables, while city residents grow more concerned about air quality. Every plastic bottle dropped in a blue bin at the Memphis airport is thrown away. And in Charleston County, a month of recycling now sits under a tarp at the Bees Ferry Landfill. “There’s no place to send it,” Charleston County Councilman Vic Rawl told a local TV station. Last month, the county chose not to extend its contract with Horry County and truck recyclables north. An existing facility located on the peninsula is outdated and ill-equipped to manage our pace and volume. Plans to build a more modern facility are on-hold. So, a covered pile of about 3,000 tons of recycled paper, glass, aluminum and plastic sits and awaits its fate. If pieces of it get wet, they’ll be buried at the landfill just like trash. We need leadership. Charleston County should be transparent about the future of its recycling program and plans to build a new facility, and it should move quickly to address the mountain of recyclables that are piling up at Bees Ferry. And we can all recommit to reducing the amount of waste we produce individually. Established recycling programs have done much to keep plastic bottles, aluminum, and glass out of the environment, but they haven’t addressed single-use plastics — plastics that are typically used once and tossed like bags, straws, and Styrofoam. Single-use plastics are not easily recycled and are often scattered throughout the environment, impacting waterways and wildlife. But local communities along our coast have stepped up and done that themselves by putting in place bans on single-use plastics. That’s one of the strongest indicators I’ve observed so far about how important our work is in South Carolina. In fact, last night, Charleston County finalized its own single-use plastics ban for unincorporated parts of our community. Senate to take up big bill with local impacts Still, efforts to deny local progress and community-driven solutions are facing strong opposition. On Wednesday, several senators again considered a bill that would unravel existing bans and prevent future local action on plastic pollution. The executive director of a national special interests group representing big plastic manufacturers traveled from Washington to attend the hearing and snubbed local bans as ineffective and “emotions based.” Mayors and council members from Folly Beach, Isle of Palms,...

Mar 29, 2019

Spring gardening events: Trillium Festival, work parties and plant sales - OregonLive.com

Native Plant Sale: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Pacific Northwest plants. To volunteer, email friends@friendsofbaltimorewoods.org. Sale, St. Johns Plaza, 7340 N. Philadelphia Ave., friendsofbaltimorewoods.orgMason Bees Workshop: 10:30 a.m.-noon. Master gardener Vione Graham leads an introductory workshop on pollination, life cycle, habitat and protection. Washougal Community Library, 1661 C St.; no registration necessary; 360-397-6060, ext. 5738 or email erika.d.johnson@wsu.edu MONDAY, APRIL 1Tree Time! Preschool Walk - Decomposers: 10-11:30 a.m. These walks geared for ages 2-6 introduce children to the wonders of nature and encourage exploration of plants, streams, bugs and wildlife. Walks are led by an arboretum naturalist, who will read a story and help with a craft to take home. $5 per child; Hoyt Arboretum, 4000 S.W. Fairview Blvd.; hoytarboretum.org or 503-865-8733Container Gardening Workshop: 4-5:30 p.m. Learn how to apply garden design concepts and color principles to garden containers. Bring a small vase and garden clippers for a bouquet design exercise. Three Creeks Community Library, 800-C N.E. Tenney Road, Vancouver; email erika.d.johnson@wsu.edu or call 564-397-5738TUESDAY, APRIL 2Celebrate Earth Day at Legacy Health: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Good Samaritan Stenzel Healing Garden, 1015 N.W. 22nd Ave. 503-413-6507 or legacyhealth.org/gardensPlant Walk: 2-2:45 p.m. Explore Lan Su Chinese Garden with a member of the horticulture staff or trained volunteer to learn about the history and cultural significance of the garden’s plants along with tips about their care. Free with membership or admission; Lan Su Chinese Garden, 239 N.W. Everett St. 503-228-8131 or lansugarden.org Seasonal Bugs & Beasties: 6:50 p.m. Master gardener Jean Natter describes seasonal critters and offers suggestions for effective and appropriate solutions. Registration not required; City of Beaverton, Griffith Park Building, Room 330, 4755 S.W. Griffith DriveWEDNESDAY, APRIL 3Wednesday Morning Honey Bee Hikes: 10-11 a.m. Look for wildlife, listen to the wind and creek, water the Children’s Discovery Garden, read a story and craft something fun. 2-5 years accompanied by adult; $3 per child, nonwalkers and adults free...

Mar 29, 2019

Ambler Students Work on Flower Power - Temple Update

Spring is approaching and flowers are ready to bloom. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is embracing “Flower Power” as the theme for this year’s Philadelphia Flower Show. The Horticulture students at Temple University Ambler have been preparing their exhibit for the annual Flower Show since the beginning of the fall semester under the supervision of Professor of Landscape Architecture Robert Kuper and Adjunct Assistant Professor Michael Lufurno. Their theme? A Hip Haven: Hangin’ Loose at a Home Refuge. Keeping true to the “Flower Power” theme and the 60’s era, the Horticulture students along with the help of their professors drew up a landscape where they would incorporate the two environments of “The Machine” and “The Haven.” With this, the students were able to come up with a very industrial side that centered around steel in comparison to the commune side which is centered around nature and reusable materials. In 2018, Temple’s exhibit “Within Reach: Unlocking the Legacy of our Hidden River” was recognized with a PHS Silver Medal; the Chicago Horticultural Society Flower Show Medal and the Chicago Horticultural Society Flower Show Medal, pres...

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