Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Mendenhall, MS

Find local Mendenhall, Mississippi florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Mendenhall and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Mendenhall Flower Shops

Mendenhall MS News

Nov 3, 2016

Anderson Stevenson Wilke Funeral Home notices for Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Falls, MT 59912; The Myrna Loy in Helena, http://myrnaloycenter.com/support and the American Indian Institute, American Indian Institute, 502 West Mendenhall Street, Bozeman, MT 59715. Please visit www.aswfuneralhome.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Nina. ELLISON, Jean, age 96, of White Sulphur Springs passed away Friday, September 30, 2016. A service celebrating Jean’s life will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 5th at The Yoked Parish of First Presbyterian and American Lutheran Churches, 411 E. Jefferson Street in White Sulphur Springs. A reception will follow the service in the fellowship hall of the church. A private family graveside service will be held at the Mayn Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Lutheran/Presbyterian Yoked Parish, Meagher County Library Foundation, the Trinity Lutheran Church in Lennep, MT, or to a charity of one’s choice. Please visit www.stevensonwilke.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Jean. BROWNE, Lachlan D., of Helena passed away Friday, October 21st, 2016. A service celebrating Lachlan’s life will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, November 5th, at Anderson Stevenson Wilke Funeral Home, 3750 N. Montana Ave, Helena, MT 59602. A reception will immediately follow the service in the reception hall of the funeral home. If you wish to honor Lachlan please consider making a memorial donation to: Ronald McDonald House of Western Montana, 3003 Fort Missoula Rd., Missoula, MT 59804 or to the Browne Family, who will be starting a Foundation to further medical research around infant liver failure. Please visit www.aswfuneralhome.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Lachlan. (Helena Independent Record)

Nov 3, 2016

Anderson Stevenson Wilke Funeral Home notices for Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Falls, MT 59912; The Myrna Loy in Helena, http://myrnaloycenter.com/support and the American Indian Institute, American Indian Institute, 502 West Mendenhall Street, Bozeman, MT 59715. Please visit www.aswfuneralhome.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Nina. ELLISON, Jean, age 96, of White Sulphur Springs passed away Friday, September 30, 2016. A service celebrating Jean’s life will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 5th at The Yoked Parish of First Presbyterian and American Lutheran Churches, 411 E. Jefferson Street in White Sulphur Springs. A reception will follow the service in the fellowship hall of the church. A private family graveside service will be held at the Mayn Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Lutheran/Presbyterian Yoked Parish, Meagher County Library Foundation, the Trinity Lutheran Church in Lennep, MT, or to a charity of one’s choice. Please visit www.stevensonwilke.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Jean. BROWNE, Lachlan D., of Helena passed away Friday, October 21st, 2016. A service celebrating Lachlan’s life will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, November 5th, at Anderson Stevenson Wilke Funeral Home, 3750 N. Montana Ave, Helena, MT 59602. A reception will immediately follow the service in the reception hall of the funeral home. If you wish to honor Lachlan please consider making a memorial donation to: Ronald McDonald House of Western Montana, 3003 Fort Missoula Rd., Missoula, MT 59804 or to the Browne Family, who will be starting a Foundation to further medical research around infant liver failure. Please visit www.aswfuneralhome.com to offer a condolence to the family or to share a memory of Lachlan. (Helena Independent Record)

Oct 21, 2016

Contrary to claims, cutting the flowers downtown won't save the city much money

The city grows all of the flowers it uses in the downtown basket, planters and beds in a greenhouse off of Riverside Drive in the Mendenhall Valley, near the high school and the new public library. The Parks and Recreation Department spends about $1,000 to $2,000 per year on flower seeds, but that is the only exclusively flower-related city expense. Ben Patterson, the department’s landscape maintenance supervisor, said that he and his team of 10 part-time employees are responsible for maintaining the flowers during the summer, but nobody solely works with flowers. According to Duncan, Patterson and the landscaping team are responsible for mowing about 1.1 million square feet of turf each week. In addition to keeping up with the parks controlled by the city, the department’s landscapers have to mow and maintain the grounds of the Juneau International Airport, Centennial Hall, the Juneau Police Department, Evergreen Cemetery, the libraries and several other city properties. “When we eliminate somebody that means, by definition, that something is not going to get mowed; something is not going to get landscaped; something is not getting flowered,” Duncan told the Empire. “We really don’t have single purpose people. A lot of people are doing a lot of different things.” Becker, an incumbent looking to hold her District 1 Assembly seat, told the Empire on Thursday that “there’s always a fine line” when it comes to cutting the cities budget. On one hand, she sees it as a necessary exercise. On the other, she doesn’t want cuts to impact jobs. “It always decreases jobs, and I don’t like jobs being decreased,” Becker said. She also expressed some doubts about expecting volunteers to fill in for Patterson and his crew permanently. “Like everything else, volunteerism doesn’t last forever,” she said. If voters allow her to hold her seat come municipal election day, which is Oct. 4, Becker said she’d continue researching whether it would be prudent for the city to stop acting as downtown’s gardener. Assembly candidate Gregory said he plans to do the same if voters elect him to fill incumbent Kate Troll’s areawide Assembly seat. Unlike Becker, Gregory said he doesn’t necessarily believe city officials who say cutting flowers would only save about $35,000. “I think that number is a little small — a lot small, actually,” Gregory said. “I want to see the details because the devil is in the details. That’s one of those things where if I’m on the Assembly, I could get the full story.” • Contact reporter Sam DeGrave at 523-2279 or sam.degrave@juneauempire.com. Read more news: Walker: No decision on the Road yet Assembly candidate Quayle talks lactation with big-bust models on Twitter Murkowski presses Forest Service on delayed land swap ... (Juneau Empire (subscription))

Oct 21, 2016

Contrary to claims, cutting the flowers downtown won't save the city much money

The city grows all of the flowers it uses in the downtown basket, planters and beds in a greenhouse off of Riverside Drive in the Mendenhall Valley, near the high school and the new public library. The Parks and Recreation Department spends about $1,000 to $2,000 per year on flower seeds, but that is the only exclusively flower-related city expense. Ben Patterson, the department’s landscape maintenance supervisor, said that he and his team of 10 part-time employees are responsible for maintaining the flowers during the summer, but nobody solely works with flowers. According to Duncan, Patterson and the landscaping team are responsible for mowing about 1.1 million square feet of turf each week. In addition to keeping up with the parks controlled by the city, the department’s landscapers have to mow and maintain the grounds of the Juneau International Airport, Centennial Hall, the Juneau Police Department, Evergreen Cemetery, the libraries and several other city properties. “When we eliminate somebody that means, by definition, that something is not going to get mowed; something is not going to get landscaped; something is not getting flowered,” Duncan told the Empire. “We really don’t have single purpose people. A lot of people are doing a lot of different things.” Becker, an incumbent looking to hold her District 1 Assembly seat, told the Empire on Thursday that “there’s always a fine line” when it comes to cutting the cities budget. On one hand, she sees it as a necessary exercise. On the other, she doesn’t want cuts to impact jobs. “It always decreases jobs, and I don’t like jobs being decreased,” Becker said. She also expressed some doubts about expecting volunteers to fill in for Patterson and his crew permanently. “Like everything else, volunteerism doesn’t last forever,” she said. If voters allow her to hold her seat come municipal election day, which is Oct. 4, Becker said she’d continue researching whether it would be prudent for the city to stop acting as downtown’s gardener. Assembly candidate Gregory said he plans to do the same if voters elect him to fill incumbent Kate Troll’s areawide Assembly seat. Unlike Becker, Gregory said he doesn’t necessarily believe city officials who say cutting flowers would only save about $35,000. “I think that number is a little small — a lot small, actually,” Gregory said. “I want to see the details because the devil is in the details. That’s one of those things where if I’m on the Assembly, I could get the full story.” • Contact reporter Sam DeGrave at 523-2279 or sam.degrave@juneauempire.com. Read more news: Walker: No decision on the Road yet Assembly candidate Quayle talks lactation with big-bust models on Twitter Murkowski presses Forest Service on delayed land swap ... (Juneau Empire (subscription))

Oct 5, 2016

Contrary to claims, cutting the flowers downtown won't save the city ...

The city grows all of the flowers it uses in the downtown basket, planters and beds in a greenhouse off of Riverside Drive in the Mendenhall Valley, near the high school and the new public library. The Parks and Recreation Department spends about $1,000 to $2,000 per year on flower seeds, but that is the only exclusively flower-related city expense. Ben Patterson, the department’s landscape maintenance supervisor, said that he and his team of 10 part-time employees are responsible for maintaining the flowers during the summer, but nobody solely works with flowers. According to Duncan, Patterson and the landscaping team are responsible for mowing about 1.1 million square feet of turf each week. In addition to keeping up with the parks controlled by the city, the department’s landscapers have to mow and maintain the grounds of the Juneau International Airport, Centennial Hall, the Juneau Police Department, Evergreen Cemetery, the libraries and several other city properties. “When we eliminate somebody that means, by definition, that something is not going to get mowed; something is not going to get landscaped; something is not getting flowered,” Duncan told the Empire. “We really don’t have single purpose people. A lot of people are doing a lot of different things.” Becker, an incumbent looking to hold her District 1 Assembly seat, told the Empire on Thursday that “there’s always a fine line” when it comes to cutting the cities budget. On one hand, she sees it as a necessary exercise. On the other, she doesn’t want cuts to impact jobs. “It always decreases jobs, and I don’t like jobs being decreased,” Becker said. She also expressed some doubts about expecting volunteers to fill in for Patterson and his crew permanently. “Like everything else, volunteerism doesn’t last forever,” she said. If voters allow her to hold her seat come municipal election day, which is Oct. 4, Becker said she’d continue researching whether it would be prudent for the city to stop acting as downtown’s gardener. Assembly candidate Gregory said he plans to do the same if voters elect him to fill incumbent Kate Troll’s areawide Assembly seat. Unlike Becker, Gregory said he doesn’t necessarily believe city officials who say cutting flowers would only save about $35,000. “I think that number is a little small — a lot small, actually,” Gregory said. “I want to see the details because the devil is in the details. That’s one of those things where if I’m on the Assembly, I could get the full story.” • Contact reporter Sam DeGrave at 523-2279 or sam.degrave@juneauempire.com. Read more news: Walker: No decision on the Road yet Assembly candidate Quayle talks lactation with big-bust models on Twitter Murkowski presses Forest Service on delayed land swap ... (Juneau Empire (subscription))

Oct 5, 2016

Contrary to claims, cutting the flowers downtown won't save the city ...

The city grows all of the flowers it uses in the downtown basket, planters and beds in a greenhouse off of Riverside Drive in the Mendenhall Valley, near the high school and the new public library. The Parks and Recreation Department spends about $1,000 to $2,000 per year on flower seeds, but that is the only exclusively flower-related city expense. Ben Patterson, the department’s landscape maintenance supervisor, said that he and his team of 10 part-time employees are responsible for maintaining the flowers during the summer, but nobody solely works with flowers. According to Duncan, Patterson and the landscaping team are responsible for mowing about 1.1 million square feet of turf each week. In addition to keeping up with the parks controlled by the city, the department’s landscapers have to mow and maintain the grounds of the Juneau International Airport, Centennial Hall, the Juneau Police Department, Evergreen Cemetery, the libraries and several other city properties. “When we eliminate somebody that means, by definition, that something is not going to get mowed; something is not going to get landscaped; something is not getting flowered,” Duncan told the Empire. “We really don’t have single purpose people. A lot of people are doing a lot of different things.” Becker, an incumbent looking to hold her District 1 Assembly seat, told the Empire on Thursday that “there’s always a fine line” when it comes to cutting the cities budget. On one hand, she sees it as a necessary exercise. On the other, she doesn’t want cuts to impact jobs. “It always decreases jobs, and I don’t like jobs being decreased,” Becker said. She also expressed some doubts about expecting volunteers to fill in for Patterson and his crew permanently. “Like everything else, volunteerism doesn’t last forever,” she said. If voters allow her to hold her seat come municipal election day, which is Oct. 4, Becker said she’d continue researching whether it would be prudent for the city to stop acting as downtown’s gardener. Assembly candidate Gregory said he plans to do the same if voters elect him to fill incumbent Kate Troll’s areawide Assembly seat. Unlike Becker, Gregory said he doesn’t necessarily believe city officials who say cutting flowers would only save about $35,000. “I think that number is a little small — a lot small, actually,” Gregory said. “I want to see the details because the devil is in the details. That’s one of those things where if I’m on the Assembly, I could get the full story.” • Contact reporter Sam DeGrave at 523-2279 or sam.degrave@juneauempire.com. Read more news: Walker: No decision on the Road yet Assembly candidate Quayle talks lactation with big-bust models on Twitter Murkowski presses Forest Service on delayed land swap ... (Juneau Empire (subscription))

Aug 29, 2016

Suburban students return to school Thursday

Holland-Handy said the new times are an improvement for most students. “Kids will be spending less time on the bus,” she said. Superintendent Jarod Mendenhall said the old system was causing a variety of issues, including kids being dropped off by late-arriving buses, as well as having to sometimes wait as long as 40 minutes after school for a bus to pick them up for their route home. “We’re doing it for the right reasons,” Mendenhall said of the change. The changes will also increase the district’s efficiency and save money on fuel and drivers during a time of education funding cuts, when all savings matter. More than 60 percent of the district’s student population — which has surpassed 19,000 — rides buses. Mendenhall spent time visiting several schools on Thursday. He said two of the biggest things to look forward to at the district this year are a new strategic plan and a recommendation on the high school configuration process. Mendenhall, who took the helm at Broken Arrow in 2010, said this will be the second strategic plan process the district has undertaken since he started as superintendent. He said all stakeholders will have a place at the table during the process. As for the high school configuration process, a committee has been researching how best to address the growing population at the district’s one high school. The options being considered are adding a high school, separating the high school into academies — like a fine arts academy, or a STEM academy — or dividing the high school population into grade centers. Mendenhall said a recommendation will be made in the spring. In Owasso, high school students started their year with a Chromebook computer in hand. Assistant Superintendent Amy Fichtner, who spent the day visiting school sites, said this is the first year the students received their own Chromebook. Last year, the devices were used in class sets. “This year each (student) had it issued to them, that way they can utilize it in all of their classrooms,” she said. Fichtner said the new language arts textbooks are on the devices, and each year as the district purchases new books, textbooks for other subjects will be digital. The district started the year with all staff vacancies filled, Fichtner said. She said the effects of the budget cuts will not be visible to most parents this year, because class sizes have increased only incrementally. Fichtner said the district, which has just under 10,000 students, is renewing its focus on STEM activities. She sai... (Tulsa World)

Aug 29, 2016

Suburban students return to school Thursday

Holland-Handy said the new times are an improvement for most students. “Kids will be spending less time on the bus,” she said. Superintendent Jarod Mendenhall said the old system was causing a variety of issues, including kids being dropped off by late-arriving buses, as well as having to sometimes wait as long as 40 minutes after school for a bus to pick them up for their route home. “We’re doing it for the right reasons,” Mendenhall said of the change. The changes will also increase the district’s efficiency and save money on fuel and drivers during a time of education funding cuts, when all savings matter. More than 60 percent of the district’s student population — which has surpassed 19,000 — rides buses. Mendenhall spent time visiting several schools on Thursday. He said two of the biggest things to look forward to at the district this year are a new strategic plan and a recommendation on the high school configuration process. Mendenhall, who took the helm at Broken Arrow in 2010, said this will be the second strategic plan process the district has undertaken since he started as superintendent. He said all stakeholders will have a place at the table during the process. As for the high school configuration process, a committee has been researching how best to address the growing population at the district’s one high school. The options being considered are adding a high school, separating the high school into academies — like a fine arts academy, or a STEM academy — or dividing the high school population into grade centers. Mendenhall said a recommendation will be made in the spring. In Owasso, high school students started their year with a Chromebook computer in hand. Assistant Superintendent Amy Fichtner, who spent the day visiting school sites, said this is the first year the students received their own Chromebook. Last year, the devices were used in class sets. “This year each (student) had it issued to them, that way they can utilize it in all of their classrooms,” she said. Fichtner said the new language arts textbooks are on the devices, and each year as the district purchases new books, textbooks for other subjects will be digital. The district started the year with all staff vacancies filled, Fichtner said. She said the effects of the budget cuts will not be visible to most parents this year, because class sizes have increased only incrementally. Fichtner said the district, which has just under 10,000 students, is renewing its focus on STEM activities. She sai... (Tulsa World)

Jan 8, 2016

Top 10 of 2015

Investigators eventually deemed the deaths of Tamisha Mendenhall, 34, Jeffrey Mendenhall, 54, and their children, Thomas, 6, and Olivia, 3, a murder-suicide carried out by the parents. State police Sgt. Mark Henschell said the probe turned up nothing that could have triggered the incident. “It was a surprise to everybody we talked to,” he said. The Mendenhalls appeared to be a tight-knit, happy family to their neighbors along Shady Lane, their coworkers at Munson Medical Center and teachers at their child’s school. But police reports show both Jeffrey and Tamisha Mendenhall showed past suicidal behavior and were involuntary hospitalized for treatment. Children’s Protective Services officials opened a case in 2013 after Tamisha Mendenhall attempted suicide. A heavily-redacted CPS report showed officials determined she posed a “moderate” risk to her children, but ultimately deemed the situation safe, based upon her participation in local mental health services. On Aug. 13, state troopers arrived at the Mendenhalls’ door because Jeffrey Mendenhall hadn’t shown up to work for days. The family’s death prompted authorities to comb through their mobile home. Investigators discovered empty prescription bottles for a medication — Benzodiazepine, a drug used to treat anxiety and induce sleep — in the home. They also discovered a helium tank and empty trash bags with plastic tape on them, vinyl tubing and a valve for the helium tank. Detectives believe Jeffrey or Tamisha Mendenhall drugged the children and used helium gas to kill them. Jeffrey, too, likely died from the gas. Tamisha died of blood loss from the stab wound. Authorities found a note at the scene proclaiming the children’s innocence in the matter. Investigators later found that both Jeffrey and Tamisha Mendenhall spent Aug. 11 gathering the drugs and helium, respectively. Their cause of death is listed as “suicide.” Thomas and Olivia died in a “homicide,” Henschell said. “We can glean from that both parents are culpable in the deaths of their children,” he said. Tall buildings City commissioners initially welcomed a proposal to bring 64 affordable housing units to Traverse City’s downtown and provide the project an estimated $300,000 per year tax break. But some of that support evaporated when commissioners and citizens understood the full size and scope of the Pine Street Development One Project proposed for the corner of West Front and Pine Streets. The affordable housing covered just one wing of an L-shaped, nine-story building that would border the int... (Traverse City Record Eagle)

Dec 30, 2015

Thirty-Two Student-Athletes Graduate in 2015 Fall Term

The 18 graduates from football include: Will Adams (Sandy Creek, Ga.), Shon Coleman (Memphis, Tenn.; Graduate degree), Xavier Dampeer (Mendenhall, Miss.), Devonte Danzey (Tampa, Fla.; Graduate degree), TJ Davis (Tallahassee, Fla.), Kenny Flowers (Lilburn, Ga.), Kris Frost (Butler, N.C.), Brandon Fulse (Ft. Meade, Fla.), Justin Garrett (Stone Mountain, Ga.; Graduate degree), Keymiya Harrell (Selma, Ala.; Graduate degree), Jonathan Jones (Carrolton, Ga.); Duncan McKinney (Florence, Ala.), Cassanova McKinzy (Birmingham, Ala.), JaViere Mitchell (Leeds, Ala.); Tyler Nero (Atmore, Ala.), Aubrey Phillips (Olive Branch, Miss.; Graduate degree), Daniel Pond (Spanish Fort, Ala.) and Jonathan Wallace (Phenix City, Ala.). The four baseball graduates include: Robby Clements (Birmingham, Ala.), Jordan Ebert (Foley, Ala.), Blake Austin (Douglasville, Ga.) and Will Kendall (Marietta, Ga.). Graduating from women’s track and field were Kali Carney (Clermont, Fla.); Valentina Muzaric (Velika Gorica, Croatia) and Elissa Parker (New Orleans, La.). Lukas Ollert (Munich, Germany) was the men’s tennis graduate and Katie Buff (Morganton, N.C.) graduated from equestrian. The five remaining graduates include Nicole Quinn (Windermere, Fla.) from women’s golf, Kara Koster (Aurora, Ill.) from gymnastics, Branndi Melero (Canyon Country, Calif.) from softball, Logan Beal (Plano, Texas) from women’s soccer and Chantel Tremitiere (Williamsport, Pa.; Graduate degree) from women’s basketball. The 32 graduates collectively hail from 11 sta... (Auburn Tigers Official Athletic Site)