Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Mississippi, MS Florists

Find florist in Mississippi state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Mississippi city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Mississippi Cities

Mississippi State Featured Florists

Beautiful Flowers & Frames

1411 City Avenue North
Ripley, MS 38663

Flower Co

100 Russell St
Starkville, MS 39759

Magnolia Wholesale Florist

425 Robert E Lee Drive
Tupelo, MS 38801

Blossoms In Studio of Flowers

167 W Third St
Forest, MS 39074

Blossom Shop

2454 Church Street
Byhalia, MS 38611

Mississippi Flowers News

Sep 19, 2019

In The Garden | Tiger swallowtail butterflies abundant this summer - Mansfield News Journal

Other states prevented from planting due to weather include Arkansas, Michigan and Mississippi. • Northwest Ohio was hit hardest for wet fields, namely Fulton and Williams counties. • In Ohio, a total of more than 1.5 million acres that normally would be planted were unplanted this year — a total of 881,000 acres of corn and 599,000 of soybeans. Our hope is we don't get a couple more back-to-back seasons like 2019 We realize there could be more wet seasons ahead, but hope that doesn't happen. Farmers nationwide appreciate all of the support during this tough year. Brain food • The most beautiful flowers grow in rocky soils and crevices. • Humans have one mouth and two ears; there is a message there. Richard Poffenbaugh is a retired biology teacher and active home gardener since 1960. He is a member of the Mansfield Men's Garden Club and was editor of the club newsletter (The Greenhorn) for 21 years. He resides in Ontario with his wife, Barbara. Reach him at 419-529-2966.

Jul 5, 2019

Could a 'little-known' Mississippi law get Curtis Flowers out on bail? - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Alissa Zhu Mississippi Clarion Ledger Published 4:00 AM EDT Jul 3, 2019 The new lawyer for a Mississippi man who has been tried six times for the same crime — the murder of four employees at a furniture store in 1996 — believes a state law can help get Curtis Flowers out on bail. The law appears to require judges to set bail in capi...

Jun 22, 2019

Flowers, Crosses, Clauses, and Oaths - Slate Magazine

A flurry of decisions this week, but few big-ticket items. Mark Joseph Stern takes us through the opinions and dissents in Flowers v. Mississippi, Gundy v. United States. and American Legion v. American Humanist Association. Dahlia Lithwick is also joined by Jed Shugerman and Andrew Kent of Fordham University Law School, two of the authors of the Harvard Law Review article “Faithful Execution and Article II,” which examines whether the Constitution holds the president to some higher standard than not just not doing crimes. To listen to this episode of Amicus, use the player below: Get More Amicus Slate Plus members get extended, ad-free versions of our podcasts—and much more. Sign up today and try it free f...

May 31, 2019

These Flowers Have Been Growing for 103 Years - The New York Times

Belma Fashions. On a recent morning, the firm’s 61-year-old president, Warren Brand, was leading a tour there for a group of fashion students from Mississippi State University. They had come to see a unicorn, a scrappy holdout, a working museum of old-fashioned artisanship that somehow had to turn a modern-day profit.Schmalberg, a fourth-generation family business founded in 1916, makes artificial flowers from silk and other fabrics for clients including milliners, theatrical costume designers, fashion stylists, bridal houses and designer labels like Oscar de la Renta, Ralph Lauren and Marc Jacobs. The flowers adorned the Thom Browne hybrid suit-dress that Zazie Beetz wore to the Met Gala, and they have decorated the angel wings of a Victoria’s Secret runway model and the uniforms of Marriott employees, who wear leather camellias pinned to their suits. One year, Schmalberg made 200,000 tiny silk petals for Vera Wang to stitch into its dresses. More recently, the firm created leather leaves for the display windows of the jeweler Harry Winston’s Paris boutique.ImageWarren Brand, left, and his son Adam, who run M & S Schmalberg.CreditVincent Tullo for The New York TimesBut in the age of fast fashion and offshoring, the business of Manhattan fabric flora is not exactly bustling. Michael Kaback, a retired garment district worker who has become the area’s unofficial historian, said there were once upward of 10 a...

Mar 29, 2019

MYSTERY PLANT: Mystery Plant known for its fragrance, used in sachets - Aiken Standard

This is a shrub native to the Southeast, and is fairly common in many places from northern Virginia down through lower Mississippi. It likes to grow in rich woods, and often in the shade. Just about every part of this plant is fragrant: the bark, the leaves and, of course, the flowers. Funny thing is, the fragrance can vary widely from plant to plant in a given population and even from season to season.Its deciduous leaves are egg-shaped and somewhat pointed, usually scratchy above and softly downy beneath, although this is variable, too. The flowers, which somewhat resemble miniature magnolia blossoms, are typically maroon and reddish, sometimes varying to purple or even greenish. (In 1872, the famous Harvard botanist Asa Gray referred to the purplish flowers as “lurid.” I guess it depends on your meaning of the word “lurid.”)The flowers fit into a syndrome that some of the botanists in my department have been actively studying: reddish-brown flowers, opening in the spring, that are heavily fragrant and which attract a number of different kinds of pollinators. (Paw-paw would be an example, and there are several species of our native Trilliums that do this, too.) Such colorful and smelly flowers often attract beetles and flies, a sort of carrion flower syndrome.After the flowers are finished, fruits are produced. These fruits are sort of odd: elongated and bag-like, they contain a number of smooth, brown seeds which eventually dribble out of an opening at the end. These plants are rather easy to grow, I think. There are several horticultu...