Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Missouri, MO Florists

Find florist in Missouri state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Missouri city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Missouri Cities

Missouri State Featured Florists

Linda's Flowers, Inc.

1255 W Battlefield St
Springfield, MO 65807

Schnucks Florist

3431 Union Blvd
Saint Louis, MO 63115

Simply Floral Too

17025 Highway 67 S
Neelyville, MO 63954

Cassville Florist

200 W 1St St
Cassville, MO 65625

Creations By Karen Inc

8101 North Broadway
Saint Louis, MO 63147

Missouri Flowers News

Jul 26, 2019

Beargrass and yucca: two signature Montana plants - Valleyjournal

In the late spring of 1806 during their expedition west, Lewis and Clark discovered and named the plant. However, while traveling along the Missouri River above present-day Yankton, South Dakota, in Sept. 2, 1804, Clark’s journal entry mentions seeing “bear grass” (actually yucca) on the dry river plains. In those days, yucca was called beargrass, and since there is a great deal of similarity between the two, it may explain why Lewis and Clark applied the name “beargrass” to the mountain plant when they encountered it in the Rockies. Interestingly, it isn’t a grass and bears won’t touch it, but mountain goats will eat the leaves, and deer, elk and bighorn sheep dine on the blossoms. On the return trip from the Pacific, as the Corps of Discovery neared what would become Montana, they gathered samples of beargrass plants. On June 26, 1806, Lewis wrote: “There is a great abundance of a species of beargrass which grows on every part of these mountains. Its growth is luxuriant and continues green all winter but the horses will not eat it.” During their long winter at Fort Clatsop in Oregon, Lewis noticed the Clatsop Indians making baskets. He recorded: “Their baskets are formed of cedar bark and beargrass so closely interwoven with the fingers that they are watertight without the aid of gum or rosin; some of these are highly ornamented with strans of bear grass, which they dye of several colors and interweave in a great variety of figures; this serves them the double purpose of holding their water or wearing on their heads.” It is for the construction of these baskets that the beargrass becomes an article of traffic among the natives. This grass grows only on their high mountains near the snowy region: “The young blades, which are white from not being exposed to the sun or air, are those most commonly employed, particularly in their neatest work.” Of the beargrass samples collected on the expedition, two still exist: one at the Lewis and Clark Herbarium and the other at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew near London. Also called “soapweed,” “Spanish bayonet” and, as we have just learned, “beargrass,” yucca blooms from a low cluster of long, pointed, spikey leaves. During the growing season, a tall stalk will emerge and produce large n...

Jul 26, 2019

Flowers at nature sanctuaries in Columbia are in full bloom - Columbia Missourian

Together, the two properties span 130 acres, according to the Great Missouri Birding Trail’s website. The Columbia Audubon Society finished seeding native Missouri grasses and flowers in this prairie in 2016. The grassy trails that meander through the prairie treat those who explore them to a bouquet of coneflowers, bee balm, brown-eyed Susans and more.Special thanks to Missourian reader Lois Shelton for telling us about the blooms.

Jul 5, 2019

News Wrap: Supreme Court throws out Flowers conviction - PBS NewsHour

Judy Woodruff: Last month, Missouri's Republican governor also signed a law banning most abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy.In Hong Kong, there were fresh protests today, demanding that city leaders scrap a proposal allowing extraditions to mainland China. More than 1,000 demonstrators wearing black rallied outside the police headquarters and government buildings. Others marched in the streets and put up barricades, but there was no violence.Violent anti-Russian clashes, though, did break out overnight in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia, and at least 240 people were hurt. Some were left bleeding after police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at the demonstrators who were trying to storm the Parliament Building in Tbilisi, the capital. Anti-Russian feeling...

Jul 5, 2019

Exotic flowers, burlap, and mini disco balls: How Sara Perez-Ekanger built a floral design company - The Advocate

Sara Perez-Ekanger's road to "flower lady" status may have begun with a Springfield, Missouri big-box-store peace lily named Alejandro that she bought for her college dorm room.Or it could have been the exotic flora she encountered in El Salvador (the country of her parents’ birth), Nicaragua, Guatemala or the other Central American locales to which her work as a translator for missionary groups brought her. Or it could have been the plants that her mom cultivated in their home — no matter how large or small the home — and transported with them any time the family moved.“Those plants represented home for me,” Perez-Ekanger says.Or it could be simple coincidence. Perez-Ekanger grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, and after a brief stint in junior college and two semesters spent abroad working as a translator for Christian missionary groups, a family friend encouraged her to apply for a basketball scholarship to attend Evangel University in Missouri. There, she met her husband, Trevor. Shortly after they graduated, they married. A few months later, they moved to New Orleans.Perez-Ekanger’s “career” was ...

May 31, 2019

Slow Flowers Announces 2019 American Flowers Week - PerishableNews

MICHIGAN: Heather Grit, Glamour and Grit Floral (floral design), with plants and greenery provided by Speyer Greenhouse and Hart Tree FarmMISSOURI: Andrea K. Grist, Andrea K. Grist Floral Art (floral design), with flowers provided by Beth and Joel Fortin of Little Green Garden LLCOREGON: Beth Syphers, Crowley House Flower Farm (floral design), with flowers provided by Bethany and Charles Little, Charles Little & Co. SOUTH CAROLINA: Toni Reale, Roadside Blooms (floral design), with flowers provided by Laura Mewbourn, Feast & Flora Farm WASHINGTON: Tammy Myers, First & Bloom (floral design), with flowers supplied by Amy Brown, Laughing Goat Farm and Seattle Wholesale Growers Market Images for all of these looks and links to the creative teams are available at American Flowers Week Press Page (americanflowersweek.com) MORE ABOUT AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEKHeld in the heart of American Flowers Week, the third annual Slow Flowers Summit takes place on July 1 and 2, 2019, at the Paikka Event Space in St. Paul, Minnesota. Developed to stimulate new, sustainable practices in floral design and growing, the Summit and features flower farm tours, a farm-to-table dinner on a flower farm, presentations on floral design, best business practices, industry innovations and an interactive floral installation for all participants. Details are available at SlowFlowersSummit.com. American Flowers Week receives sponsorship from Syndicate Sales, Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Longfield Gardens, Mayesh Wholesale Florist, Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers, and Florists’ Review magazine. American Flowers Week supporters can find more information and resources at americanflowersweek.com. Downloadable fact sheets, infographics and 2019 American Flowers Week logo and social media badges are available for growers and florists to use for marketing and promotion efforts. Participants are encouraged to use the social media tag #Americanflowersweek to help spread the word about this campaign across all platforms. ### About American Flowers Week: American Flowers Week is designed to engage the public, policymakers and the media in a conversation about the origins of their flowers. As an advocacy effort, the campaign coincides with America’s Independence Day on July 4th, providing florists, retailers, wholesalers and flower farmers a patriotic opportunity to promote American grown flowers.About Debra Prinzing: Debra Prinzing is a Seattle-based writer, speaker and leading advocate for American Grown Flowers. Through her many Slow Flowers-branded projects, she has convened a national conversation that stimulates consumers and professionals alike to make conscious choices about their floral purchases. Debra is the producer of SlowFlowers.com, the online directory to American grown farms, florists, shops and studios who supply domestic and local flowers. Each Wednesday, approximately 2,500 listeners tune into Debra’s “Slow Flowers Podcast,” available for free downloads at her web site, debraprinzing.com, or on iTunes and via other podcast services. She is the author of 10 books, including Slow Flowers and The 50 Mile Bouquet. ...