Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Adams, MA

Find local Adams, Massachusetts florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Adams and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Adams Flower Shops

The Flower Gallery

249 N. Summer St
Adams, MA 01220
(413) 743-4900

Adams MA News

Jan 25, 2019

Durgin-Park, a sassy classic, at 192. In lieu of flowers, leave a bigger tip - The Boston Globe

It was an unknown guy named Jim Koch from someplace called Sam Adams."The people who worked there, at least when I was there, are a reflection of Boston culture. I don't mean Brahmin culture. I mean the real Boston," said Janis Benincasa, a server in the 1970s and 1980s. Advertisement But for now at least, Durgin-Park has passed into Boston lore along with Jordan Marsh, Filene's Basement, and Jacob Wirth - symbols of a simpler, vanishing city.You'd never know it two days before closing time, though. There was a line out the door, despite snow. Older folks posed next to memorabilia and promotional signage, including a holiday billboard urging families to make new holiday traditions by dining at Durgin-Park.It was a wake of sorts. Many customers came for a last hurrah. Some hadn't visited in decades but wanted to pay their respects.Bob Gulick headed in from Lexington to relive his days as a Harvard undergrad."Back then, there was still sawdust on the floors here," he said, grinning. He planned to order his favorite: fish cakes, baked beans, and Indian pudding. Advertisement Eddie and Gineen Rhodes traveled down from Peabody. Eddie used to eat here while in mortician school. (Now he works in financial planning.)"This is my favorite restaurant on the planet," he said. "My grandfather took me here when I was 6 years old for prime rib. I've been coming since 1956. I've been here twice this week."Customers were selected one by one to ascend the stairs to the dining room, which offered its own kind of theater. RELATED: Fanueil Hall's promised retail revolution? We're st...

Jul 26, 2018

Maker Mondays and other Longmont-area events for the week of July 23, 2018

Mahjong is a game of skill, strategy, calculation and a degree of chance. Newbies and beginners are welcome; 1 p.m. , Loveland Public Library, 300 N. Adams Ave., Loveland; free; 307-217-3250, lovelandpubliclibrary.org. Maker Monday - Drop in make-and-take crafts, best for children ages 10 and under. Work with different materials and mediums. This week's activity is robot-balancing STEM challenge and marble mazes; 2 p.m. , Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont; longmontcolorado.gov. Vinyl Night / Happy Hour - Got vinyl records? Come share them with other music enthusiasts over a couple beers. All genres welcome.; 5 p.m. , SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Ste D, Longmont; facebook.com/events/538853369814248. Open Mic at Bootstrap - Sign up to play at 6 p.m. and get a free beer for performing. Email dennis.m.driscoll@comcast.net with questions; 6 p.m. , Bootstrap Brewing Company, 6778 N. 79th St., Niwot; free; bootstrapbrewing.com. Open Mic with Tom Kendrot, Jam and Jiggatones - Bring your instrument or use the many on hand; 6:30 p.m. , KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont; free. Tuesday Tuesday Treasures at the Ranch - Tuesday Treasures at the Ranch has various activities for kids and adults, this week's theme is all about critters, warm and cold; 9 a.m. Tuesday, Sandstone Ranch, 3001 Sandstone Drive, Longmont; 303-774-4692, longmontcolorado.gov. Kids Film Series: "The Lorax" - This summer, cool off in the Stewart Auditorium with a bag of popcorn and a screening of "The Lorax"; 10 a.m. Tuesday, Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont; $2; 303-651-8374, longmontmuseum.org. Morning Storytime - Interactive storytime for the very youngest children, from birth through about 2 years of age with short stories, songs, nursery rhymes and fun; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont; 303-651-8477, longmontcolorado.gov. Backyard Nature & Science for Families - Feed kids' natural curiosity about the world with a science-themed storytime that includes hands-on exploration of nature around us in our own neighborhoods. Learn about everything from insects to dinosaurs and rocks to plants. This storytime includes parent or caregiver participation. Each session will end with a make-and-take activity; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont; longmontcolorado.gov. Open Mic with Andy Eppler - Bring an instrument or dancing pants; 6 p.m. Tuesday, SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., suite D, Longmont; skeyebrewing.com/events. Board Games & Beer - Joi...

May 24, 2018

As May Flowers Bloom, A Closer Look at White House Gardens Past and Present

Jefferson's two terms, but most were eaten by animals, trampled in the War of 1812, or burned in the White House fire of 1814. President John Quincy Adams used Jefferson's plans as guides for refurbishing the grounds. He hired John Ousley to help-the first of a small string of long-tenured White House gardeners. Ousley himself would serve for the next 30 years. Large changes came during James Monroe's presidency. Charles Bullfinch, architect of the Capitol, drew up plans for grading the grounds, and Charles Bizet, former gardener of the Madison family's Montpelier estate, became the White House gardener. Bizet and his assistant Thomas McGrath oversaw the construction of a stone wall on the north, and the same wrought iron gates hung between two sandstone gateposts from 1818 until 1976. President Monroe made garden improvements during the Era of Good Feelings while also completing Lafayette Square (later changed to Lafayette Park). The Square was named after General Marquis de Lafayette, the French military leader who helped American forces win the Revolutionary War. The Ellipse The Ellipse on the south end of President's Park was first laid out by President Rutherford B. Hayes in the last quarter of the 19th century. It was called the "White Lot" up until the 1930s, a name that most likely originated from the white fence surrounding it from 1849 to the 1870s. By the time Ulysses S. Grant served as president after the Civil War, the marsh was drained, allowing for an extension of the South Grounds. Due to the expansion, Downing's circle was flattened into an ellipse, which was finished in 1881. It held events such as militia drill competitions and the 26th Annual Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1892. Today, the Ellipse is a popular spot for people to walk, picnic, and view the South Portico of the White House. The Conservatory One item of significance to the White House gardens that does not survive today is the conservatory. In 1835, Jackson created an orangery in an old archives storage room that had been in use as a horse stable. The prized tree specimen was a Malayan sago from George Washington's own orangery. Keeping up the extensive collection of indoor plants was costly, and President Martin Van Buren was admonished by Congressman Charles Ogle of Pennsylvania for lavish spending on the White House grounds. When the U.S. Treasury required expansion, President Franklin Pierce had to demolish the orangery and greenhouse, although a new one was built on the roof of the White House's West Colonnade. A subsequent greenhouse President James Buchanan completed in 1857 became a favorite private escape for the Lincoln family during the Civil War. The remaining conservatory burned in 1867, after which President Grant added back a larger gr...

Mar 23, 2018

Barton Goldsmith: The re-blooms of spring

The flower lady kept moving them around the house, looking for the right light, like Ansel Adams in Yosemite, and her efforts were rewarded. A tiny new stem grew from one of the old ones that she hadn’t let me cut off. Then another one grew, and another plant, and now nearly all are flowering!Yes, you can lose everything you think is important — your beauty, your wealth, even your family — but as long as you are alive, you can find new life within the one you thought was never going to bloom again.(Dr. Barton Goldsmith, a psychotherapist in Westlake Village, Calif., is the author of “The Happy Couple: How to Make Happiness a Habit One Little Loving Thing at a Time.” Follow his daily insights on Twitter at @BartonGoldsmith©2018 Barton Goldsmith—————PHOTO (for help with images, contact 312-222-4194):... (Twin Falls Times-News)

Mar 23, 2018

2018 Wildflower Season Expected To Be Typical, But Still Terrific

Center’s new Texas Wildflower Central website at wildflower.org/texas.Contributing Experts: Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Ryan Middleton, Neil and Nan Adams, Olivia Sievers Ross, Suzanne Chapman, Toni and Benito Treviño, Sam Kieschnick...

Mar 23, 2018

Flower entrepreneur's lavish lifestyle, prior convictions described in sentencing documents

A federal prosecutor is urging a judge to send businessman David M. Adams to prison for a long time, asserting in a sentencing document that he is "one of the biggest federal tax cheats in Connecticut history."Adams, 57, of East Lyme pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in October to six tax-related crimes, and was scheduled for sentencing last week. His attorney, William T. Koch Jr., was on trial elsewhere and was granted an extension. Adams' sentencing is now set for May 30 before Judge Vanessa L. Bryant in Hartford. He faces decades in prison.Adams is the founder of Flowers USA and another online floral business, both of which he has sold. He is a principal of Saybrook Realty Partners, which has an interest in the Saybrook Junction plaza near the Old Saybrook train station.In a sentencing memorandum submitted to the court, Assistant U.S. Attorney Susan L. Wines says Adams has been a "tremendous drain on federal resources for 20 years" who appears to have no intention of ever repaying the government.As of October 2016, he owed more than $4.7 millio...