Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Amboy, IL

Find local Amboy, Illinois florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Amboy and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Amboy Flower Shops

The Main Flower Shop

232 E Main St
Amboy, IL 61310
(815) 857-3545

Amboy IL News

Apr 20, 2018

On Gardening: What's in bloom right now?

At the Arboretum’s recent sale, I found a large Cape Arid Climber (Kennedia beckxiana “Flamboyant”), a native of Cape Arid in western Australia. This vigorous, woody plant that climbs with tendrils is one of the Arboretum’s Koala Blooms selections. It produces two-inch long orange-red flowers with a showy large lime-green central spot on a reflexed petal. This plant might grow more robustly that I would prefer, but I’ve learned that it can be heavily cut back after flowering to prevent invasive growth.This plant will replace a Canna Lily (Canna “Cleopatra”) that had overgrown its pocket bed, so I moved it into containers in a sunnier location. Interestingly, the canna has been described as “flamboyant,” which is also the name of this Kennedia cultivar. I also came upon Aloe “Crosby’s Prolific,” which is a cross between A. nobilis and A. humilis, both of which are small aloes that succulent specialist Deborah Lee Baldwin recently highlighted as “growing tight and staying low.” I picked up three of these small plants to fill space in my South African succulent bed. AdvertisementA third recent acquisition is Spanish Sage (Salvia lavandufolia). After the annual cutting back of a large collection of salvias, the need emerged for smaller plants along the bed’s border. These smaller species (one-foot high ad wide) are not widely available, so I was glad to pick up three specimens as fillers. As stated on earlier occasions, plant hunting should be done with a specific and appropriate spots in the garden. Impulse purchases, inspired by a blossom portrait in a mail order catalog or a real, fertilizer-dosed plant in a garden center leads to hodge-podge landscaping. Tom Karwin is president of the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, and a Lifetime UC Master Gardener (Certified 1999–2009). Visit ongardening.com for links to information on this subject, and send comments or questions to gardening@karwin.com. (Santa Cruz Sentinel)

Jan 12, 2018

GREEN THUMBS UP: Yuletide plants brighten winter days

Few plants rival the poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) for their spectacular, long-lasting blooms. The flamboyant flowers are actually highly colored leaves or bracts with the true, insignificant yellow flowers located in the center. New hybrids include expanded shades of red often splashed with blotches or flecks of cream, green, or pink; bracts of white, pink, rose, coral and salmon are also available. Occasional fertilizing will help to maintain the rich, deep green foliage.Perhaps the easiest and most durable of all holiday plants is the so-called “Christmas Cactus” (Schlumbergera) although in recent years, its cousin, sometimes referred to as the “crab cactus” (Zygocactus) has virtually replaced its relative. Both plants are leafless with flat, jointed stems but the crab cactus features wider, upright segments with long, pointed, tooth-like projections and usually blooms earlier. Many colors of the elongated, layered flowers are now available including shades of pink, gold, fuchsia, red, salmon, and white tinted lavender. Because these plants are epiphytes, they prefer a quick-draining, soilless mixture and like to be pot-bound. Cool temperatures and short day length in autumn are required to set flower buds. These reliable houseplants will bloom year after year and thrive with little attention.The members of the shooting star or cyclamen family offer charming, butterfly-like blossoms, but I find them more challenging to maintain. They grow from a rounded corm and require cool environments shaded from sun; avoid pouring water directly on the corm to prevent rot. The distinctive single or double blooms range in color from white through shades of pink, salmon, scarlet, and lavender, and may appear for up to 4 months. Their heart-shaped leaves are equally attractive, having silver and white mottling on a dark green background. Once blooming ceases, the plant should be allowed to rest by gradually withholding water until the foliage dies back. Store in a cool basement or move the plants outdoors in summer to a shady locale keeping the soil nearly dry and the pot resting on its side. Repot in September placing the top of the tuber level with the surface of the soil.Deck the halls with holiday plants for a cheerful, colorful, Yuletide display.Suzanne Mahler is an avid gardener, photographer and lecturer. She is a member of a local garden club, past president of the New England Daylily Society, an overseer for the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and is employed at a garden center. (Wicked Local Kingston)

Aug 10, 2017

Keep flowers looking fabulous and plan for next season

When using such flamboyant flowers, they need to be presented alone or paired up with a supporting cast that doesn’t compete. A difference in texture can also be used to create drama. Pairing up larger-flowered petunias with smaller calibrachoa provides a notable impact.While at a greenhouse this spring, a calibrachoa caught my eye or was it a petunia? I had to purchase the plant to figure it out. It turned out to be both. There are now petunia/calibrachoa hybrids. SuperCal Neon Rose is just one of the new petchoas that knocks my socks off with its vibrance.Drive around and look at flower beds. Visit gardens and note those you like and combinations of flowers you’d like to try next year. Reconsider petunias if you haven’t grown them for a while. If you need a spot of color now, greenhouses are still offering a selection of good quality flowers.Julie Riley is the Tanana District horticulture agent for Cooperative Extension Service, a part of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, working in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She can be reached at 474-2423 or jariley@alaska.edu.#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }... (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner)

Jul 14, 2017

MYSTERY PLANT: Keep your eyes open for this plant; its flowers only last a day

OPENING in the darkness and closing in the morning.Our Mystery Plant is a beautiful thing on a sunny morning. Its flamboyant flowers last only one day, so you can see the new ones lending a sort of tropical flavor to your backyard. It's a plant with a dozen or so close relatives from Central America, where they like damp forests and considerable shade.All of the species have a tuft of bright green, sword-like leaves, much like an iris. The species featured here will show off a number of slender leaf-like stalks, and this is where the flowers come from.At the tip of one of these leaf-like branches, a cluster of flowers will be produced. The individual flowers aren’t too heavy, but their combined weight will sometimes cause their supportive steam to arch over and lean down to the ground.Where the stem contacts soil, roots will ultimately form, giving rise to a new plant, eventually. This is particularly useful for gardeners who are fond of propagating things: it's easy to divide up one of these plants in this way, and thus sharing "starts" with friends.As you might expect, this plant's architecture and tendency to sprawl makes it perfect for a hanging basket, hung outside all summer long, until it starts cooling off.Back to the flowers, though. Each one sports three big floppy sepals, each one bright white, sometimes with a patch of purple or red down at the bottom.The petals are showy, too: bright blue or purple and striped with red on their central portions. There will be three whitish styles right in the middle, and underneath each one of them will be a single stamen.This plant is fairly commonly grown in much of the Deep South, and here at the herbarium we get plenty of requests each summer as to its identity.John Nelson is the curator of the A.C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina, in the Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia. As a public service, the herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information, visit www.herbarium.org or call 803-777-8196, or email nelson@sc.edu.[Answer: “Walking iris," "Apostle plant," Neomarica gracilis]... (Aiken Standard)

Jun 22, 2017

Celebration of flowers will honour Lord Snowdon

Designs vary from delicate arrangements maximising texture and form, to flamboyant creations that fill the room with scent and drama. Some flowers and all the foliage are handpicked by Nymans head gardener fresh from the garden with local businesses, Mills n’ Bloom in Brighton and Tim Haynes, a florist in Pease Pottage, suppling the majority of the flowers that will be used. Many of the volunteer flower arrangers have spent years perfecting their skills. Some arrange flowers in local churches, some belong to NAFAS and some are retired professional florists. The event is free to attend but normal admission prices apply. (West Sussex County Times)

Mar 16, 2017

Non-flower gardens: 50 shades of green, plus other colors

One is a soothing, naturalistic garden that's filled with different shades of green," he says. "The other is a little more flamboyant and uses variegated plants to bring in splashes of color."Both offer a pleasing aesthetic in all seasons, and you don't need to worry about plants going in and out of bloom.A Zen-like garden keeps the focus on the garden structure itself, with greenery that's calming.Shawn Fitzgerald of the Kent, Ohio-based Davey Tree Company, thinks hardscaping should also be a consideration in these gardens."A water feature always adds a nice element — a pond, or a creek, with the sound of running water. It's especially nice if you have some lush foliage over the water," he says.He encourages adding of rocks, perhaps some large and small boulders strategically placed."And, of course, benches are always great," Fitzgerald says. "Who doesn't like to sit and reflect in a peaceful garden, under some nice shade cover?"VISUAL INTERESTHancock suggests using variegated shrubs or trees to add color and texture to a garden. Give similarly hued plants like hostas, dusty miller and succulents a tonal frame by placing them next to bluestone pavers, he suggests. Or play with scale perception by graduating dark and light greenery along a pathway. #video-ad-asset-container, #video-ad-asset-container-played { max-height: 0px; overflow: hidden; -webkit-transition: max-height 1.5s; -moz-transition: max-height 1.5s; transition: max-height 1.5s;} #video-ad-asset-container.expand { max-height: 1500px; } #video-ad-asset-container .video-responsive-ad { positi... (Bismarck Tribune)