Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Ames, IA

Find local Ames, Iowa florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Ames and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Ames Flower Shops

Ames Greenhouse Floral Ia

3011 South Duff Street
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-1332

Coe's Campus Floral & Gifts

2619 Northridge Pkwy
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 292-5432

Holub Garden And Greenhouses Inc

22085 580Th Avenue
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-4769

Hy-Vee Floral Shop

640 Lincoln Way
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-1407

Mary Kay's Flowers & Gifts

3134 Northwood Dr
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-3993

Ames IA News

Apr 20, 2018

April Showers Can Be Good For May Flowers, But Not Consumers ...

April showers alike.About SafewareHaving pioneered the technology insurance industry in 1982, Safeware is now one of the most recognized names in product protection. Safeware’s innovative approach to insurance and extended warranty solutions has propelled the company into multiple industries including education, corporate technology, fitness, furniture and appliances. By allowing partners to customize coverage based on their unique needs, Safeware provides best-in-class programs allowing customers to own their products with confidence.Learn more about Safeware online at www.safeware.com or by calling 1.800.800.1492.Attachmentshutterstock_437421712Stephanie Wise Safeware 614.781.2592 swise@safeware.com ...

Apr 20, 2018

SingleCut Beersmiths flowers Kim with hibiscus calyces

The tap handles at SingleCut are variations of guitar necks and heads, and many of the names of beers have musical references.And the bottle of Kim Hibiscus Sour Lager that I’m sharing tasting notes for this week was a beautifully crafted beer brewed in the Berliner Weisse style. If you’ve not yet experienced a Berliner Weisse, find a short primer at bit.ly/LNP_berliner.There are other iterations of Kim using adjuncts like tart cherry, red raspberry and Brettanomyces.Kim with hibiscus poured mostly orange with just a touch of pink when held to the light; the tiniest thread of a white head ringed its way around the edge of the glass and a generous, wheaten haze swelled in its body.The aroma was crisp with SweeTARTS and Nerds, a hibiscus floral tang and sour wineberries warming in late June sunshine.In flavor, tart, cranberrylike hibiscus added a bitter backbone while some brambleberry fruits swirled in with subtle sweetness. Other fruits, such as kiwi and lemon, teased and tickled my taste buds; the body had a wheat softness that faded at the end to a dry and supremely clean finish thanks to the lager yeast.Overall impression: Some Berliner Weisse beers are bracingly sour; not so with Kim. This was an enjoyable, balanced bottle to share, and one I’d buy again.Contact Amber DeGrace with comments and questions at adegrace@lnpnews.com and find her on Twitter at @amberdegrace. .lnp-adblade-wrapper { width: 100%; display: block; } @media (max-width: 600px){ .lnp-adblade-wrapper .adblade-dyna.container-34465 li { width: 50% !important; } } ...

Apr 20, 2018

LOCAL BRIEFS: 4-H Junior Leaders taking flower orders

St., today through May 7. Registration is open to the public for T-Ball, ages 3 to 5; coach pitch, ages 6 to 7; and major league, ages 8 to 11. Games will be played Tuesdays and Thursdays starting June 5. Registration is $25. Coaches are needed.GOSHENSwiss steak supper May 5Everyone is invited to a Swiss steak supper at Fairview Grange, 22482 C.R. 45, Goshen. It will take place May 5, from 4 to 7 p.m. Meals for adults are $10 and $5 for children 5 to 11 years of age. Children age 4 and younger may eat for free. For more information, call Lori at 333-4362 or Patsy at 875-6197.LIGONIERPavilion and cabin rentalsThe Ligonier Parks and Recreation Department is now accepting reservations for pavilion and cabin rentals for the 2018 season. To make a reservation, call the recreation center at 260-894-7344. (Goshen News)

Apr 20, 2018

International Day of Flowers celebration

The second Saturday of each month, revelers can enjoy live music and classic board games from 5:30-8 p.m. Every Sunday in April and May, food trucks will be on-site to provide some extra nourishment. Support for the Beer Garden is provided by the Bud Brehob Family.Guests are invited to stroll through thousands of blooms at their leisure from a garden path, featuring information about the various plants and displays, or take a guided tram tour of the display. The seasonal tour highlights what’s currently in bloom, the history of the Lilly House, and offers a chance to taste what’s cooking in the Beer Garden. A walking tour of The Garden is offered Thursdays through Sunday, and is included with admission.In The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park: 100 Acres, thousands of short blooming wildflowers will create a dazzling display. Fairbanks Park is open daily and free to visit. The spring celebration continues indoors at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Visitors can explore how spring is captured on canvas and learn how the works of art inside connect to the blooming landscape outside with the Hello Spring Gallery Tour, offered Tuesday through Fridays at 2 p.m.

Apr 20, 2018

Flower Master Wows at Casino

Ikebana is the Japanese art of flower arranging and a namesake international non-profit organization is dedicated to the promotion and appreciation of the art form. Nine different schools of design are a part of the effort and the headmaster of one recently traveled from Japan to conduct training in Gulfport.Since 1983, Akihiro Kasuya has been the headmaster of the Ichiyo School of Ikebana that is headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. He and his son, Naohiro Kasuya, the headmaster designate, conducted a stage demonstration on Tuesday, April 10 at the Catherine Hickman Theater, followed by two days of hands-on workshops at the Historic Casino, on Wednesday, April 11 and Thursday, April 12.According to the school’s website, the Ichiyo curriculum emphasizes a style of flower arranging that “harmonizes with the various spaces in our environment” and the senior Kasuya is “one of the best-known contemporary Ikebana artists” in the world.Ikebana International was founded by and is administered by volunteers.Workshop organizer and attendee, Gail Newman of Venice Island, Florida in the winter (and Rochester, New York in the summer), was sitting at a front table on Wednesday at the Casino.How did she get involved in this effort?In November of 2005, “I saw an ad in a newspaper for Ikebana International,” she said. “I went to the show, saw all the beautiful arrangements that used minimal materials and I thought I could learn how to do that! I became a ... (Gulfport Gabber)

Apr 20, 2018

Want to fight crime? Plant some flowers with your neighbor.

University Square. It now hosts regular events, replete with food trucks and lawn games.When people drive by this once derelict intersection and see a block party underway, a community organizer told me, their jaws drop.Busy streets have less crimeThese surface-level environmental changes turned out to have profound economic and societal effects on this part of central Flint.We surveyed residents there in 2014 — before the intervention began — as well as in 2016 and 2017. We are now preparing the results of the Flint study for publication in an academic journal, but here’s a snapshot of our findings.Over time, community members reported fewer mental health problems, said they’d been victims of crime less often, and felt less afraid. That’s probably because crime did go down along the University Avenue Corridor: According to the coalition’s latest report, assaults decreased 54 percent, robberies 83 percent and burglaries 76 percent between 2013 and 2018.To test the connection with the coalition’s work, we compared this area to a control group of Flint neighborhoods that had suffered similar levels of disinvestment and urban decay. We learned that places where empty lots were being maintained by the community had nearly 40 percent fewer assaults and violent crimes than untouched vacant lots.This finding is similar to data from other cities. From 1999 to 2008, for example, the city of Philadelphia cleaned up 4,436 vacant lots, signaling “ownership” with fencing, benches, plantings and the like. Gun assaults in areas where the interventions occurred dropped by 29 percent over three years. Nuisance crimes like loitering and vandalism declined 30 percent.Philadelphia also saw economic gains from maintaining empty land and fixing up abandoned properties. According to an economic analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health in 2016, for every dollar spent reoccupying an abandoned building, taxpayers saved $5 in potential criminal justice costs. Cleaned-up vacant lots saved the city even more: $26 per dollar spent.People in areas of Philadelphia with newly greened lots also reported exercising more and experiencing less stress, presumably because they felt more comfortable being outside.Resilient citiesOne likely reason that crime drops after joint neighborhood improvement projects is community engagement. Residents in the University Corridor intervention area reported participating more in neighborhood watches, block associations and community events than in the area where residents didn’t undertake improvement projects.In other words, when neighbors work together to clean up, say, an empty lot, they don’t just eliminate a href="http://www.nytim...