Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Fitzgerald, GA

Find local Fitzgerald, Georgia florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Fitzgerald and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Fitzgerald Flower Shops

Classic Design Florist

301 N Grant St
Fitzgerald, GA 31750
(229) 423-3624

My Flower Basket

708 S Grant St Ste 22
Fitzgerald, GA 31750
(229) 423-7763

Wall Flower

214 South Sherman Street
Fitzgerald, GA 31750
(229) 426-0066

Fitzgerald GA News

Oct 26, 2018

How a flower farmer found her way after a heartbreaking loss

There are times when Liz Fitzgerald thinks of her late husband, Paddy, that she wishes he could come back for a day to see how she has been coping since his untimely death after a short illness in 2013. Since that tragic time, when she lost the man she describes as the love of her life, Fitzgerald has started Bizzy Lizzies Flowers, a flower-growing business. The business operates from her garden in rural Co Waterford, which she has spent years honing from what was once an overgrown seaside valley. Neither she nor Paddy were gardening experts when they first set out to tackle the sprawling land they purchased after leaving their native Dublin in 1998. "I had a Montessori school and Paddy was a violinist. He had been with the symphony orchestra since he was 16, but I think he'd kind of had enough. We had a lovely Victorian house in Harold's Cross, but every time we went away, I'd come back and I'd say it would be great...

Oct 26, 2018

How a flower farmer found her way after a heartbreaking loss

There are times when Liz Fitzgerald thinks of her late husband, Paddy, that she wishes he could come back for a day to see how she has been coping since his untimely death after a short illness in 2013. Since that tragic time, when she lost the man she describes as the love of her life, Fitzgerald has started Bizzy Lizzies Flowers, a flower-growing business. The business operates from her garden in rural Co Waterford, which she has spent years honing from what was once an overgrown seaside valley. Neither she nor Paddy were gardening experts when they first set out to tackle the sprawling land they purchased after leaving their native Dublin in 1998. "I had a Montessori school and Paddy was a violinist. He had been with the symphony orchestra since he was 16, but I think he'd kind of had enough. We had a lovely Victorian house in Harold's Cross, but every time we went away, I'd come back and I'd say it would be great...

Oct 12, 2018

Fort Worth police officer who died Friday hailed as hero and the cement of his unit

A visibly shaken Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald made the announcement during a hastily called news conference broadcast from the hospital on Facebook Live. "We've lost a true hero, someone that has dedicated more than one tour of service to this great city and was senselessly killed by three known criminals, two of which are in custody now," Fitzgerald said. Those attending the 6 p.m. vigil said they hated the reason for the ceremony but they also said their spirits were buoyed by the gathering. It felt as though they were with family, some said. "Being that my husband is an officer, I love the community support," said Karen Ramirez, Assistant Chief Charles Ramirez's wife. "A lot of people did not know this officer personally, but they are here. This city loves the police and I love that." ...

Oct 12, 2018

Fort Worth police officer who died Friday hailed as hero and the cement of his unit

A visibly shaken Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald made the announcement during a hastily called news conference broadcast from the hospital on Facebook Live. "We've lost a true hero, someone that has dedicated more than one tour of service to this great city and was senselessly killed by three known criminals, two of which are in custody now," Fitzgerald said. Those attending the 6 p.m. vigil said they hated the reason for the ceremony but they also said their spirits were buoyed by the gathering. It felt as though they were with family, some said. "Being that my husband is an officer, I love the community support," said Karen Ramirez, Assistant Chief Charles Ramirez's wife. "A lot of people did not know this officer personally, but they are here. This city loves the police and I love that." ...

Sep 10, 2018

Silent Sam supporters memorializing statue with flowers

Silent Sam" statue over the past few years and removed the statue before it was toppled by protesters. Jonathan Fitzgerald Fuller, Lauren Aucoin, Margarita Sitterson and Raul Acre Jimenez have all been charged with misdemeanor rioting and misdemeanor defacing a public monument in connection with the Aug. 20 protest where "Silent Sam" was toppled. Since the statue fell, at least a dozen others have been arrested in connection with two subsequent protests on campus. The group that brought flowers to the place where "Silent Sam" used to stand said they plan to return every Saturday with more bouquets. More On This ...

Sep 10, 2018

Silent Sam supporters memorializing statue with flowers

Silent Sam" statue over the past few years and removed the statue before it was toppled by protesters. Jonathan Fitzgerald Fuller, Lauren Aucoin, Margarita Sitterson and Raul Acre Jimenez have all been charged with misdemeanor rioting and misdemeanor defacing a public monument in connection with the Aug. 20 protest where "Silent Sam" was toppled. Since the statue fell, at least a dozen others have been arrested in connection with two subsequent protests on campus. The group that brought flowers to the place where "Silent Sam" used to stand said they plan to return every Saturday with more bouquets. More On This ...

Dec 29, 2017

How an impoverished flower man inspired Richmonders to give back

He was such a nice gentleman and a beloved fixture on the Boulevard,” recalled Beth Fitzgerald. “He would always give me a flower and a smile as I headed to VCU.”Robertson and his wife, Virginia, were far from wealthy.“He used to be a shoemaker,” Virginia Robertson told me many years ago. She said he told her, “I want to be with you and sell flowers.”His popularity was such when the police had his metal flower shack removed as a nuisance in 1967, the public demanded the city return it. And it returned.When he died from diabetes and other health problems in the fall of 1988, Richmonders were shocked to learn (see story below) that Robertson died so poor, the city was arranging for an unmarked pauper’s grave. No flowers for him.No way was the Flower Man going out like that!Within days an anonymous donor - and there were several offers - paid for a flower-filled funeral and burial at Mount Calvary Cemetery.A fund was set up to help support his beloved wife.And, a little more than a year after his death, his little monument was in place.The day after its October 7, 1989 dedication, the following editorial about it appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch:“Monument Avenue, with its statues of heroes whose names children learn in school, runs only a block or two from Mr. Robertson’s stone. His monument is neither imposing nor large, but its humble simplicity raises it to a grandeur of its own -- for it is written that the meek shall inherit the earth.”The Times-Dispatch follow-up story about the reaction to Robertson’s death:CITY'S FLOWER VENDOR DIED POOR, BUT WAS RICH IN FRIENDS AND LOVERichmond Times-Dispatch (VA) (Published as Richmond Times-Dispatch) - September 29, 1988* Author/Byline: Mark Holmberg; Times-Dispatch staff writer"I ain't going to die rich," Gilbert Robertson, Richmond's most beloved flower vendor, predicted several years ago.But if love and caring can be measured, Robertson will go to his grave a wealthy man.When Richmonders learned yesterday that the body of the man who sold flowers at the corner of the Boulevard and Kensington Avenue for half a century was in a funeral home awaiting state funds for a pauper's funeral, the response was spectacular.Within hours after sunrise, an anonymous donor paid for a burial at the Mount Calvary Cemetery."There were a couple of people who were willing to pay for the... (wtvr.com)

Dec 29, 2017

How an impoverished flower man inspired Richmonders to give back

He was such a nice gentleman and a beloved fixture on the Boulevard,” recalled Beth Fitzgerald. “He would always give me a flower and a smile as I headed to VCU.”Robertson and his wife, Virginia, were far from wealthy.“He used to be a shoemaker,” Virginia Robertson told me many years ago. She said he told her, “I want to be with you and sell flowers.”His popularity was such when the police had his metal flower shack removed as a nuisance in 1967, the public demanded the city return it. And it returned.When he died from diabetes and other health problems in the fall of 1988, Richmonders were shocked to learn (see story below) that Robertson died so poor, the city was arranging for an unmarked pauper’s grave. No flowers for him.No way was the Flower Man going out like that!Within days an anonymous donor - and there were several offers - paid for a flower-filled funeral and burial at Mount Calvary Cemetery.A fund was set up to help support his beloved wife.And, a little more than a year after his death, his little monument was in place.The day after its October 7, 1989 dedication, the following editorial about it appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch:“Monument Avenue, with its statues of heroes whose names children learn in school, runs only a block or two from Mr. Robertson’s stone. His monument is neither imposing nor large, but its humble simplicity raises it to a grandeur of its own -- for it is written that the meek shall inherit the earth.”The Times-Dispatch follow-up story about the reaction to Robertson’s death:CITY'S FLOWER VENDOR DIED POOR, BUT WAS RICH IN FRIENDS AND LOVERichmond Times-Dispatch (VA) (Published as Richmond Times-Dispatch) - September 29, 1988* Author/Byline: Mark Holmberg; Times-Dispatch staff writer"I ain't going to die rich," Gilbert Robertson, Richmond's most beloved flower vendor, predicted several years ago.But if love and caring can be measured, Robertson will go to his grave a wealthy man.When Richmonders learned yesterday that the body of the man who sold flowers at the corner of the Boulevard and Kensington Avenue for half a century was in a funeral home awaiting state funds for a pauper's funeral, the response was spectacular.Within hours after sunrise, an anonymous donor paid for a burial at the Mount Calvary Cemetery."There were a couple of people who were willing to pay for the... (wtvr.com)

May 7, 2017

Flowers and jazz in full bloom in Westminster

Quartet earned two Grammys, two Emmys and a Golden Globe. Vadala has also performed with Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Chick Corea, Ella Fitzgerald, Aretha Franklin and more.Vadala said he loves having the opportunity to perform at events like the festival where they have the opportunity to bring jazz to the people."It obviously expands our audience," Vadala said. "When you're playing the Blues Alley in D.C., you're getting people who follow jazz. With this, you've got people coming out on what is hopefully a nice day, and we can reach people who might not normally listen to jazz."Vadala said though he has degrees in classical music, he's been playing jazz since he was in junior high school. He said the more you listen to and perform it, the more it grows on you."It's America's genuine music. It all comes down to that and rock and roll," Vadala said. "I don't want to say I'm a crusader, but I love to play it and it feels great to perpetuate an art form that doesn't normally have a large audience, but has a very devoted audience."Coffey said in addition to the larger names, he likes to tap into Carroll's passionate jazz performers for the annual festival. He said they like to switch up the lineup each year a little bit to keep it fresh while also involving and supporting the student population."I love the fact that we can have an event where we get to highlight music downtown," Coffey said. "When it comes to jazz, it's the feel of it. The spontaneity and creativity that allows you to express yourself that makes jazz what it is."jacob.denobel@carrollcountytimes.com410-857-7890Twitter.com/Jacob_deNobelIf You GoWhat: Flower and Jazz FestivalWhen: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 13Where: Downtown WestminsterCost: FreeFor more information: Visit westminstermd.gov/flowerjazz... (Baltimore Sun)

Mar 16, 2017

Non-flower gardens: 50 shades of green, plus other colors

A Zen-like garden keeps the focus on the garden structure itself, with greenery that's calming.Shawn Fitzgerald of the Kent, Ohio-based Davey Tree Company, thinks hardscaping should also be a consideration in these gardens."A water feature always adds a nice element — a pond, or a creek, with the sound of running water. It's especially nice if you have some lush foliage over the water," he says.He encourages adding of rocks, perhaps some large and small boulders strategically placed."And, of course, benches are always great," Fitzgerald says. "Who doesn't like to sit and reflect in a peaceful garden, under some nice shade cover?"VISUAL INTERESTHancock suggests using variegated shrubs or trees to add color and texture to a garden. Give similarly hued plants like hostas, dusty miller and succulents a tonal frame by placing them next to bluestone pavers, he suggests. Or play with scale perception by graduating dark and light greenery along a pathway. #video-ad-asset-container, #video-ad-asset-container-played { max-height: 0px; overflow: hidden; -webkit-transition: max-height 1.5s; -moz-transition: max-height 1.5s; transition: max-height 1.5s;} #video-ad-asset-container.expand { max-height: 1500px; } #video-ad-asset-container .video-responsive-ad { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; padding-top: 30px; height: 0; overflow: hidden; margin-bottom: 20px; } "One of my favorite ways to make a small space feel larger is to plant varieties that have rich green, purple, or orange foliage up front, and incorporate white-variegated leaves at the back. Because the light color recedes, it creates an optical illusion of more space," he says.No matter what hardiness zone you're in, there's one annual he recommends for any non-traditional garden."Coleus is one of the most versatile foliage plants you can choo... (Bismarck Tribune)