Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Colorado, CO Florists

Find florist in Colorado state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Colorado city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Colorado Cities

Colorado State Featured Florists

Flowerama

5090 South Broadway
Englewood, CO 80113

Ortega Nicholas Landscapng Jr

2721 Yates Street
Denver, CO 80212

Flower Box

15473 East Hampden Avenue
Aurora, CO 80013

More Flowers

2501 15Th Street Unit 1A
Denver, CO 80211

King Sooper Floral #25

11747 W Ken Caryl
Littleton, CO 80127

Colorado Flowers News

Jan 12, 2018

Latest: Flowers, fun as Rose Parade rolls under sunny skies

Image 3 of 5FILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, Odd Fellows and Rebekahs Rose Float moves along Colorado Boulevard during 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few clouds are expected Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena as the city plans to celebrate the 129th Rose Parade, and temperatures are expected to be in the mid-70s. lessFILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, Odd Fellows and Rebekahs Rose Float moves along Colorado Boulevard during 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few clouds are expected Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, in ... more Photo: Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP Image 4 of 5FILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, Blue Springs High School band "The Golden Regiment" performs in the 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few clouds are expected Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena as the city plans to celebrate the 129th Rose Parade, and temperatures are expected to be in the mid-70s. lessFILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, Blue Springs High School band "The Golden Regiment" performs in the 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few clouds are expected Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena ... more Photo: Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP Image 5 of 5FILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, the Singpoli Group float "A Bright Future," winner of the Grand Marshal's trophy, moves along Colorado Boulevard in the 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few clouds are expected Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena as the city plans to celebrate the 129th Rose Parade, and temperatures are expected to be in the mid-70s. lessFILE--In this Jan. 1, 2015, file photo, the Singpoli Group float "A Bright Future," winner of the Grand Marshal's trophy, moves along Colorado Boulevard in the 126th Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif. Only a few ... more Photo: Ringo H.W. Chiu, AP ...

Jan 12, 2018

Homestead band blossoms through Rose Parade

Belford, a sophomore who plays tenor drums, the most memorable aspect was “definitely marching around TV Corner (the intersection of Orange Grove and Colorado boulevards) and seeing the rest of the parade with people lining the streets to watch us. “That view is something I will remember forever,” he said. One of the head drum majors, Shani Zuniga, called marching in the Rose Parade an “honor beyond words.” “The whole experience didn’t feel real until we’d made the turn down Colorado Boulevard on TV Corner,” she said. “The 5.5-mile parade itself felt endless as we were marching it, but when we reached the end, the whole band was smiling and laughing regardless of the aching feet and sore muscles.” Zuniga added that “everybody was so happy with what we’d just accomplished, and we couldn’t be more grateful for the support we got along the route and back home.” Tyler Vu, a junior who plays the marimba, echoed Zuniga’s gratitude. “My Rose Parade experience was phenomenal, as I had the chance to witness the growth of many inexperienced students from the beginning of the season (as they changed) into passionate and high-performing players in front of large audiences and television – all while still having fun,” he said. “We’ve worked hard all season, making friends and growing closer every practice.” Head drum major Joseph Cho, in his senior year, said the trip felt “bittersweet.” “There’s obviously no better way to end a four-year career in marching band than to march in the Rose Parade,” he said, “but having made the trip to Southern California before, once in 2014 and again in 2016, the tedious bus rides and fantastic experiences at Disneyland brought a sense of nostalgia; we even made the same bus and lunch stops going to and back from Pasadena.” Terry Anderson, president of the Homestead Music Boosters, said the Rose Parade was an incredible experience not only for the students, but also for the teachers and parents. “It was such a wonderful feeling to see them march by, thinking about how many people around the world were watching our kids in this famous parade,” she said. Band director John Burn shared Anderson’s excitement as well as a few fun facts: The 129th Rose Parade boasted eight broadcasts, 20 bands, 300 horses, 8 mill...

Jan 12, 2018

New flower shop Fancy Pansy opens in Avon

AVON — Flowers never go out of style, which is why longtime Eagle County local and Colorado native Frankie Sheridan started Fancy Pansy out of her garage five years ago.Last month, Sheridan officially opened her brick and mortar store at 51 Beaver Creek Place (across from City Market and next to Columbine Bakery), which is the only flower shop in Avon."After so many years of working out of my garage, it's a dream come true to finally have my own storefront," Sheridan said. "We are looking forward to designing according to our clients' individual needs while utilizing our knowledge of materials and patterns to create arrangements that are beautiful and memorable."Variety of ArrangementsSince its inception in 2012, Fancy Pansy has become a local favorite known for crafting unique floral designs for weddings, restaurants and...

Dec 29, 2017

A Colorado baker, a Richland florist: Do religious beliefs justify discrimination?

Court to overturn the decision. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) A Christian baker in Colorado, who wouldn't craft a wedding cake for a gay couple, took center stage before a divided U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, in a case that will decide whether religious conviction can be a basis for discrimination.The baker has a counterpart in Richland, Wash., florist Barronelle Stutzman, convicted of violating the state's anti-discrimination law after she refused to provide flowers for the same-sex wedding of a long-term client.The case drew an unusually long 90-minute argument before the Supreme Court and more than 100 amici curiae briefs.Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, author of seminal gay rights opinions, appeared likely the deciding vote.With the Trump administration arguing the case of baker Jack Phillips, Kennedy asked whether Phillips could have put a sign in the window: "We don't bake cakes for gay weddings." He described the administration's argument as offensive to the "dignity" of LGBTQ people.But Kennedy took Colorado officials to task in their treatment of Phillips, saying: "It seems to me the state in its position has been neither tolerant nor respectful of Mr. Phillips' religious beliefs."  The justice suggested a state civil rights commission was excessive when it ordered Phillips to have remedial training for his workers.The case poses a basic question: Can religious beliefs be used to get around laws that forbid discrimination based on sexual preference or gender identity?Yes, the religious right has argued. "Pray that the Supreme Court will protect religious liberty and people of faith across our nation," evangelist Franklin Graham tweeted, with a picture of Jack Phillips.No, said the state of Washington in a strongly worked amicus curiae brief."Allowing commercial businesses to use the First Amendment as a shield for discriminatory conduct would undermine state civil rights law and the vital benefits they provide to residents and visitors , leaving behind a society separate and unequal by law," said the brief, filed by Attorney General Bob Ferguson.EMAIL NEWSLETTERS: Get breaking n...

Dec 29, 2017

Alamosa Flowers: Berries for wildlife

It does have female and male plants.LifeScapeColorado.com reports that the Berry Magic Holly variety from Monrovia is self-pollinating. It is listed as zone 5, not hardy enough for the SLV. Another Monrovia variety is Winter Red rated down to zone 2. However, it needs male and female plants and consistently moist soil.Cotoneasters are often cited as berry-producing plants that attract birds. However, my Peking contoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia) is not attractive to any animals! It retains its berries year after year. I enjoy looking at them!“Did you know Santa is three times a gardener? He hoes, hoes, hoes.” My take on various Santa jokes.