Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Weed, CA

Find local Weed, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Weed and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Weed Flower Shops

Dawson Wreaths / Weed Florista

142 South Weed Boulevard
Weed, CA 96094
(530) 938-8824

Weed CA News

Oct 10, 2019

Gardening: Some plants are gifts that just keep giving - OCRegister

I received the following email.“I love alyssum because it reseeds itself. When it is finished blooming I remove it, weed the flowerbed and then shake the removed alyssum over the flowerbed. The removed alyssum is full of seeds and my flowerbed is reseeded. It doesn’t take long for new plants to start to appear and not too long after that mature blooming plants.” — Dee Van Dam, North Ontario In the manner of alyssum, some plants are gifts that keep on giving. There is no reason to run to the nursery to buy annual flowers when you have these on hand since their seeds germinate with ease. Often referred to as sweet alyssum (Lobularia maritima) due to its flowers’ delicate fragrance, there is really nothing that compares to this annual bedding plant, which does not exceed one foot in height, as a garden selection. It is often utilized for edging around planter beds on account of its mounding growth habit, yet it can admirably cover large beds on its own — a true blanket bloomer — where it takes on the look of undulating white foam. When used for edging a bed of annuals, it contrasts well with yellow and gold marigolds, red salvia (Salvia splendens), and blue mealy cup sage (Salvia f...

Oct 10, 2019

Betty Montgomery: Cyclamen give the woodland garden a splash of color - Middletown Transcript

As the trees defoliate I leave the fallen leaves in the bed to help feed the soil and to help prevent weeds from sprouting in the area. Leaves make a nice mulch as they blanket the ground.When you choose a site, make sure you are not near a sprinkler head, a ditch or a downspout. They like some dampness in the winter but they need to be dry in the summer when those sprinklers are going off. Remember where they originated and this will help you.Many of you are likely familiar with the florist cyclamen as they have become quite popular to have during the Christmas season. During the 1800s, the Victorians became enamored with cyclamen. They prized these winter-blooming flowers and used them to decorate during this time of year. They were so popular, that much breeding work was done to make the flowers larger as well as different colors and other traits. This work produced the florist cyclamen that we know today.When you have seen drifts of cyclamen blooming, I bet you too will be enchanted at how these dainty flowers can make a memorable show. I remember well the first time I saw a planting of them under an oak tree and I still think of that charming sight. I hope mine will one day be as thick and lush as those.Betty Montgomery is a master gardener and author of “Hydrangeas: How To Grow, Cultivate & Enjoy,” and “A Four-Season Southern Garden.” She can be reached at bmontgomery40@gmail.com. ...

Oct 10, 2019

Where to find flowers at NYC restaurants, bars and coffee shops - Time Out

Think of Homecoming as your one-stop shop for fancy chocolates, great coffee, artist-designed weed pipes and flowers offered by the stem. 107 Franklin St, Brooklyn, NY 11222 The Fleur Room / Putnam & Putnam...

Oct 10, 2019

Planning year-round blooms - Los Altos Town Crier

California poppies can rebloom if they are cut back after they begin to set seed, and occasionally watered. An easy summer wildflower is tarweed, with red-accented yellow daisy-like flowers. One of our wildflowers is widely used as a spring cover crop: tansy-leaf phacelia. It grows approximately 3 feet high, and bees are drawn to its lavender blue flowers. Finally, don’t overlook native bunchgrasses. They offer pollen and overwintering sites, as well as undisturbed shelter for beneficial insects. With their flowering stems backlit by the sun, grasses add a dramatic element to the garden. Tanya Kucak gardens organically. Email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. ...

Oct 10, 2019

Medford's Electrical Boxes Are Now Covered With Plants And Animals Of The Mystic River Watershed - WBUR

There's a monarch butterfly atop milkweed and an endangered New England cottontail rabbit (not the ones we find in our gardens, which are usually eastern cottontails) with dark berries. Her painting of a blue heron and water lily is one of Tuttle’s favorites. This work sits close to the sidewalk’s edge and gets nicked by car doors.The 33-year-old interdisciplinary artist adeptly infuses pressing issues — such as the environment and the policies that affect it — into her work. Tuttle's work “examines humanity’s collective priorities for the planet” and draws upon Russian Icon paintings and the Mexican mural movement of the 1920s for inspiration. In one of her studio pieces, “Axolotl,” a salamander swims amid fast-food soda cups and harmful plastic bottles. In “Borderlands,” walls at the U.S.-Mexico border prevent the Sonoran Pronghorn from migrating and breeding with its Mexican sister population, further threatening the endangered animal. In her mural work, she tries to “bring nature into spaces [where] we've kind of forgotten about it,” she explains.Artist Sophy Tuttle in front of her painting "Red Fox & Blue Wood Aster." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)Sophy Tuttle's "Red Fox & Blue Wood Aster." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)For this series on Medford's electrical boxes, she wanted to draw attention to the Mystic River — a body of water just a block away from the town center that could often be ignored. Tuttle talks about the 60% decline in the world’s populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians in the last 40 years. She says that “re-imagining future possibilities ... re-imagining our relationship with nature and the way that we treat the world” is paramount for her. As cars whiz by in the bustling center, the paintings invite viewers to linger, even if it’s just for a moment.There’s no overt climate change messaging or call to action in the imagery. But curious viewers who follow Tuttle on Instagram will see tidbits about the animals and plants that provide more context. For instance,...

Oct 10, 2019

Invasion: Protectors of Prescott's watersheds wary of non-native plants - The Daily Courier

One man’s weed is another man’s treasure. Take cottonwoods, for example. To irrigation farmers in places like Phoenix, cottonwoods may be perceived as a nuisance due to the tree’s great use of water. But in the eyes of Prescott Creeks, a nonprofit that strives to achieve healthy watersheds and clean waters in central Arizona for the benefit of people and wildlife, cottonwoods are a welcomed companion. “Our belief is that if you have a good, healthy cottonwood system, then you’re going to have overall more moisture in the system,” said Michael Byrd, executive director of Prescott Creeks. Byrd explained that cottonwoods keep water in the banks of the creeks with their roots. The trees also transpire moisture through their leaves and provide shade, creating a more humid environment. Even more significant, though, is cottonwoods are native to central Arizona and hospitably share the land with other native plant species. This is not the case for plants like spotted knapweed and common tea...