Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Santa Clarita, CA

Find local Santa Clarita, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Santa Clarita and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Santa Clarita Flower Shops

Lissette's Flowers

24328 Main St
Santa Clarita, CA 91321
(661) 287-3589

Santa Clarita CA News

Mar 15, 2019

Garden events in the San Fernando Valley, March 15-22 - LA Daily News

March 30, April 6 and 13. Fee $20 for one class; $55 for all three. Register by phone of email: rosescordino@gmail.com. Community Gardens of Santa Clarita at Central Park,27150 Bouquet Canyon Road. 661-713-7003. bit.ly/2VUp8JP Right Plant, Right Place: Lili Singer leads the class, 1:30 p.m. March 30. Fee $35. Theodore Payne Foundation, 10459 Tuxford St., Sun Valley. 818-768-1802. bit.ly/2F3dGoF Pasadena Heritage Spring Home Tour – Historic Homes and Gorgeous Gardens: Drive-yourself event to docent-guided interior stops, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. March 31. Tickets $43; $48 day of event. www.pasadenaheritage.org/springtour; bit.ly/2TAmR9X VISIT Adamson House and Malibu Lagoon Museum: Guided tours of the house, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Garden tour, 10 a.m. Friday. Admission $7; $2 ages 6-16; cash only. 23200 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. 310-456-8432. www.adamsonhouse.org Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve: Park hours: sunrise-sunset daily. The Jane S. Pinheiro Interpretive Center hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday during the season and special events. Wildflower hotline: 661-724-1180. Admission $10 per vehicle. No dogs on trails. 15101 Lancaster Road (from Highway 14, go 15 miles west off of Avenue I exit, road becomes Lancaster Road). Call ahead to confirm center hours. 661-946-6092. www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=627 Conejo Valley Botanical Garden: Specialty gardens include bird habitat, butterfly, desert, rare fruit, herb, orchard and tranquility. Hours: sunrise-sunset daily. Closed on July 4; heavy rain and if trails are muddy (trails may be muddy for several days after rain). Children's garden: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 400 W. Gainsborough Road, Thousand Oaks. 805-494-7630. www.conejogarden.org Descanso Gardens: Specialty gardens include ancient forest, California natives, camellias, Japanese, lilacs, oak forest and rose. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily (except closed on Christmas). Admission $9; $6 seniors and students; $4 ages 5-12.

Aug 10, 2017

Steve Hanauer, Longtime SCV Florist, Dies at 76

Longtime Santa Clarita resident Steve Hanauer – the “Steve” in Steve’s Valencia Florist – died Wednesday night from complications stemming from a fall he sustained the previous day.Not just a florist, Hanauer was also a fixture in the Santa Clarita community, known for his generous support of local charities including the SCV Senior Center and the SCV Boys and Girls Club.“He was very proud of this valley,” said his widow, Jan Hanauer. “He loved the people. He was very prominent with the ‘old-school Santa Clarita’ community and was always willing to help.”The local entrepreneur owned and operated Steve’s Florist since 1974 – which makes it the oldest full-service flower shop in Santa Clarita. Prior to the Santa Clarita location, Hanauer owned flower shops in San Fernando and Brentwood.The business expanded at one point to three locations in the Santa Clarita Valley, but Jan Hanauer said they later decided to dwindle it down to one – the original and current location on Lyons Avenue in Newhall. “... (SCVNEWS.com)

Sep 21, 2016

How a rare flower could delay a Santa Clarita Valley development -- again

In a move that may impact development on a prime parcel in the Santa Clarita Valley, a federal agency is proposing to classify the San Fernando Valley spineflower as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, an environmental group said Wednesday. Once thought to be extinct, there are now only two known populations of the flower, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. The threatened species action is part of a settlement between and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Center to speed protection for 757 species of plants and animals, according to John Buse, senior counsel at the Center. “It’s wonderful news that this plant has finally been proposed for Endangered Species Act protection,” he said. “The act can ensure it sticks around for future generations to enjoy.” But you can’t find the small flower in the San Fernando Valley or in many other areas. The only place it grows locally is in the Santa Monica Mountains of Ventura County and on the proposed Newhall Ranch development site in the Santa Clarita Valley, said Buse. The V... (LA Daily News)

Sep 14, 2016

Rare San Fernando Valley Flower Proposed for Endangered Species Act Protection

Service placed the flower on the candidate waiting list for protection. In 2000 an additional population of the flower was discovered near Santa Clarita in Los Angeles County, within the footprint of the proposed Newhall Ranch development project. The Service has received multiple petitions to protect the flower. In 1999 the city of Calabasas petitioned for the plant’s protection; the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy petitioned for its protection in 2000; and the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned for its protection in 2004. In 2011 the Center and the Service reached a landmark agreement requiring the agency to make decisions on all of the plants and animals on the candidate waiting list by the end of this fiscal year. The Ventura County population is protected from development because it occurs in a designated open space preserve. The population in the footprint of the Newhall Ranch development has been proposed for management under a conservation plan developed by the company, under the state Endangered Species Act, that allowed the company to remove part of the population in exchange for creating preserves to protect about 75 percent of the plants. Protection under the federal Endangered Species Act will require the company and state to work with the Service to develop an expanded and supplemented conservation strategy. “This added federal protection is needed and welcome, because the current plan is inadequate to safeguard this unique wildflower from development,” said Buse. In addition to development, the plant is threatened by non-native invasive plants, Argentine ants, grazing, agriculture, utility-line maintenance, recreation and global climate change. Following today’s proposed protection, the Service will accept public comment before finalizing protection for the plant in one year. The plant’s scientific name is Chorizanthe parryi var. fernandina. The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.1 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places. (Center for Biological Diversity )

Sep 14, 2016

Rare San Fernando Valley flower up for endangered species protection

In a move that may impact development on a prime parcel in the Santa Clarita Valley, a federal agency is proposing to classify the San Fernando Valley spineflower as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, an environmental group said Wednesday. Once thought to be extinct, there are now only two known populations of the flower, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. The threatened species action is part of a settlement between and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Center to speed protection for 757 species of plants and animals, according to John Buse, senior counsel at the Center. “It’s wonderful news that this plant has finally been proposed for Endangered Species Act protection,” he said. “The act can ensure it sticks around for future generations to enjoy.” But you can’t find the small flower in the San Fernando Valley or in many other areas. The only place it grows locally is in the Santa Monica Mountains of Ventura County and on the proposed Newhall Ranch development site in the Santa Clarita Valley, said Buse. The V... (LA Daily News)

Aug 15, 2016

Wildfires, wildflowers are part of California's cycle of life

Monterey County drifted into the Central Valley. Another massive wildfire torched several square miles near Santa Clarita just north of Los Angeles. While incredibly destructive and expensive to fight, fire also can rejuvenate California’s native landscapes. Renewal by fire is built into many native plants’ DNA. Several plants need high heat or smoke exposure to sprout seeds, particularly those native to chaparral or shrub land. Some pine cones must be exposed to fire to spring loose their seeds. Nature has its own system of checks and balances, scientists say. Fire burns off natural oils and secretions from shrubs that block competition from other plants. Clearing away old growth, fire in turn increases the diversity of chaparral plants. Likewise, fire can rejuvenate forests, too, putting nutrients back into the soil to stimulate new growth. Generally, it’s the annuals that put on the brightest post-fire flower show, experts say. No longer shaded in the forest’s understory, golden daisies glow in the extra sunlight. Indian paintbrush and scarlet larkspur offer splashes of vivid red. Pink lupines and purple penstemons bloom in abundance. Those flowers were always present but unseen, their seed waiting in the soil for the right opportunity. “Some of the seeds stay in the ground for years and years before it’s stimulated by fire,” said Blackburn, past president of the Redbud Chapter of the California Native Plant Society. Intense heat breaks down their seed coats or other inhibitors and allows the seeds to sprout. Several native shrubs and trees will regrow after fire, too. They form a basal burl underground that remains viable through fire. This specialized root structure is common among chaparral’s larger plants and allows California shrub lands to bounce back rapidly after disaster. Likewise, several California oak species also re-sprout, usually at the base, although the process may take decades. This year’s wildflower season got another boost unrelated to flame. Throughout... (Hanford Sentinel)