Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Hemet, CA

Find local Hemet, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Hemet and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Hemet Flower Shops

Elite Flowers Of Hemet

1291 E Florida Ave
Hemet, CA 92543
(951) 766-5005

Eva's Flowers And Gifts

540 North San Jacinto Street
Hemet, CA 92545
(951) 791-1848

Pro Wedding Flowers

736 N State St
Hemet, CA 92543
(951) 256-7034

Hemet CA News

Nov 28, 2018

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces ‘super bloom’ in hills above Glendora - The San Gabriel Valley Tribune

California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills. Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants. On Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay soil during the winter unique to the Glendora hills. A bounty of rainfall grew the green leaves and stems, producing flowers three days before Earth Day, on April 19, she said. “Here they come!” she exclaimed, pointing to a bunch in the middle of the tall wild oats. “They sneak up on you.” Toward the south end of the 4-acre meadow, the bunches appeared more frequently. “They look for a place to hide, like finding a companion plant,” she explained. That way they can be protected from ravenous deer. “They are survivors.” Even the Colby Fire of January 2014 did not stop them. In fact, the ash from the fire helped enhance the soil, which helped the Brodiaea to germinate. These Brodiaea filifolia in Glendora are the purest of the species, she said. They are pollinated by a bee fly, which keeps their DNA the same. About 20,000 plants are thriving along the ridgeline above the Colby Trail. In Bluebird Canyon exist another 5,000 and about another 10,000 in another hillside canyon, she said. The Colby Trail is open to the public during the daytime. Croissant reminds everyone to stay on the trails. “They are state and federally protected, so that means you could be arrested or cited for any kind of abuse to the plant,” she said. The Glendora Conservancy is hosting a Brodiaea Month and is offering a special program on the plant on May 20 at the Glendora Library, with a lecture by Croissant and a video on the plant’s history. The plant is the city’s official flower. Glendora is the only city in California with an endangered species as its city flower.

Sep 10, 2018

Limits on hours and graveside memorials at San Jacinto cemetery has upset some families

And, the cemetery, located in San Jacinto on the border with Hemet, is now open from 7:30 a.m. until 10 p.m. Cemetery manager Carol Griese said the changes were made for maintenance and safety reasons. “No one is being banned from decorating,” she said. After a social media campaign was started regarding the changes, some 30 people showed up at the San Jacinto Valley Cemetery District board meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 14 – about half spoke out on the issue. Many got emotional about why they don’t like the changes. Alex Olivas, whose sister Elizabeth Olivas is buried at the cemetery, said the lack of flowers and other items makes the cemetery look lonely. “It doesn’t look lively,” he said. “We did lose our loved ones, but we want to keep them alive.” Veronica Ontiveros said she has a number of family members buried at the cemetery. The changes are difficult because everybody grieves differently, she said. “You will not stop us from our religious rites,” Ontiveros said, objecting to not being able to pray all night, especially on Dia de los Muertos. Others said they wanted to be able to visit a site to pray in the middle of the night. “You cannot deny us that,” Ontiveros said. Other speakers said they paid for th...

Dec 29, 2017

A gift of thanks reaches Hemet city officials helping a grieving family

Such is the case with Lake Elsinore resident Sylvia Monaco, an employee of the Hemet Wal-Mart who once lost her 10-month-old great grandchild.Lake Elsinore Councilman Daryl Hickman who hearing of Monaco’s tragic loss contacted her to say that a memorial plaque for her grandson would be placed under magnolia tree in the city’s first community garden.“The excitement of waiting for the stone to be finished turned my sorrow into joy,” Monaco said. She visited the garden and the memorial stone often and found comfort and peace, thinking to herself that she wanted to share her feelings with others.Then in March, she saw the tremendous heartbreak suffered by her Wal-Mart supervisor Sasha Grey, whose sister Kristin Wimbley, 44, brother-in-law Alphoso Wimbley, 55, and nephew Kyan Wimbley, 12, were killed in a tragic traffic accident caused by an alleged drunken driver in Corcoran.Monaco told Grey about putting a memorial in a community park for her family.“I talked to Sasha, and she wanted it too,” Monaco said.12-08-17-local- City gift of thanks-cphoto-1Hemet Mayor Linda Krupa shares a hug with Sasha Grey during a recent memorial plague installation at Mary Henley Park. Courtesy photo" Hemet Mayor Linda Krupa shares a hug with Sasha Grey during a r... (Valley News)

Dec 8, 2017

There are metro-east roots for the Botanical Garden's holiday train show

It’s a long-time tradition for a lot of people,” said Katie O’Sullivan, MoBot’s senior public information officer.Mexican themeThis year’s show focuses on Mexico, where poinsettias are native. Scace’s merry band of volunteers built a courtyard with adobe-style facades and a fountain. Mexican music plays overhead.Roughly 2,000 poinsettias include red, pink, white, yellow, even orange and lime green. All were grown in greenhouses on site.If you can grow a poinsettia in St. Louis, you can grow anything. They’re known as a problem plant. Insects love them. Diseases love them. The right amount of light and water is crucial.Derek Lyle on the challenges of growing poinsettias“We have 15 different cultivars,” Scace said. “Some of them are grown as single stems (making them taller), and some are grown as pinch plants (making them fuller). When you pinch them, they create more bracts.”The daytime cost of Gardenland Express is $5, plus the regular MoBot admission of $12 for adult non-members.This year for the first time, officials are allowing free admission to the show for people who have tickets to the nighttime Garden Glow, which costs $16 to $18 for adult non-members.“We know that more people will be able to see it, and it adds to the value of the Garden Glow ticket,” O’Sullivan said.Flower familyScace’s grandfather, Charlie Diehl, owned Diehl’s Nursery in Columbia. Her parents, Leroy and Ruth Diehl, operated Diehl Florist in Waterloo.Scace’s favorite place as a girl was under the wrapping table, where she played with paper scraps and shipping boxes. As a teen, she waited on customers and delivered flowers.“If you’re in the florist business, you are entrenched in the community,” she said. “You experience life’s major events with people — births, anniversaries, holidays, funerals.”Scace studi... (Belleville News-Democrat)

Aug 10, 2017

'Flowers don't kill': Dozens protest in support of woman taken down by Riverside County sheriff's deputy

I wasn’t there,” Vasquez said.“We definitely understand the public’s concerns,” he added.People from Perris, Anaheim, Santa Ana, and Hemet attended the protest, which was organized by an indigenous rights group known as the Mexica Movement.Christian Lem, 23, who shot and shared the 43-second video clip on Twitter attended the demonstration. He held a sign that read, “No more racist cops!”Lem said he was walking in the area before deputy “got physical.” He said the deputy was being rude while the woman was trying to explain in Spanish that she did not speak English.“That why I decided to stay,” Lem said. “All I saw was fear in her face.”The video clip was shot June 7 and shows the woman trying to get away from the deputy, who grabs her hair and forces her to the ground. He covers her mouth with one hand and then twists and places her arm behind her back.She was selling flowers and Hawaiian-style leis without a permit outside of Perris High School while motorcycle deputies provided traffic control during the graduation ceremony, according to the Sheriff’s Department news release.The Sheriff’s Department said deputies warned and cited 15 people for vending without the necessary city permits.Mendez-Medrano refused to cooperate and attempted to walk away, the Sheriff’s Department said in the release, which also said she gave fake names and pushed the deputy away. He held her arm to prevent her from fleeing, the statement said.Vito D’Angelo, of Perris, attended the protest in support of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department.“I’m not saying every officer is perfect … but neither is every citizen,” D’Angelo said. (Press-Enterprise)

Jul 27, 2017

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces 'super bloom' in hills above ...

California this spring don’t display a blanket-like palette like the state flower, the orange-hued California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills.Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants.AdvertisementOn Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay soil during the winter unique to the Glendora hills. A bounty of rainfall grew the green leaves and stems, producing flowers three days before Earth Day, on April 19, she said.“Here they come!” she exclaimed, pointing to a bunch in the middle of the tall wild oats. “They sneak up on you.”Toward the south end of the 4-acre meadow, the bunches appeared more frequently.“They look for a place to hide, like finding a companion plant,” she explained. That way they can be protected from ravenous deer. “They are survivors.”Even the Colby Fire of January 2014 did not stop them. In fact, the ash from the fire helped enhance the soil, which helped the Brodiaea to germinate.These Brodiaea filifolia in Glendora are the purest of the species, she said. They are pollinated by a bee fly, which keeps their DNA the same.About 20,000 plants are thriving along the ridgeline above the Colby Trail. In Bluebird Canyon exist another 5,000 and about another 10,000 in another hillside canyon, she said.The Colby Trail is open to the public during the daytime. Croissant reminds everyone to stay on the trails. “They are state and federally protected, so that means you could be arrested or cited for any kind of abuse to the plant,” she said.The Glendora Conservancy is hosting a Brodiaea Month and is offering a special program on the plant on May 20 at the Glendora Library, with a lecture by Croissant and a video on the plant’s history. The plant is the city’s official flower. Glendora is the only city in California with an endangered species as its city flower. (The San Gabriel Valley Tribune)