Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Arvin, CA

Find local Arvin, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Arvin and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Arvin Flower Shops

Arvin Flowers & Gifts

600 Tucker Street
Arvin, CA 93203
(661) 854-2329

Katrina's Bridal And Flower Shop

529 Bear Mountain Blvd
Arvin, CA 93203
(661) 854-4052

Arvin CA News

Mar 15, 2019

You have the roses, now create garden magic - Marin Independent Journal

Pink or red roses look good with some of the pink geraniums like G. oxonianum or G. ‘Patricia,’ he notes; other options include Erigeron karvinskianus, Sanguisorba, Sedum, Japanese anemones, aster and Astrantia. • Experiment with extreme color combinations. "The trick is to choose colors that sing with great gusto, not abrasiveness," Marriott says. "It's great fun to play with this." Before you commit, try out the colors first by holding snips of each plant next to each other. "Some combos will sound a sour note and others will sing.” • Use different shapes for visual texture. "The spiky upright flowering spikes of mullein and foxglove contrast wonderfully with the rounded, informal form of shrub roses," he says. Or, choose something with a soft rounded shape such as Hakone grass or Pheasant's grass. • Deep garden beds can host taller plants in back. Good choices include giant scabious, delphinium and tall (New England) asters. • If you’re not sure whether to plan for a long season of garden interest or an exquisite, but short-term, color explosion, Marriott says go for broke" and choose the big, splashy moments even if they last only briefly. Don't-miss events • Learn how to grow berries in a free seminar from 8 to 9 a.m. March 9 during Armstrong Garden Center's Super Strawberry Saturday. Enjoy free refreshment and score a free strawberry plant with any purchase from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., or while supplies, last at 1430 S. Novato Blvd. in Novato. Call 415-878-0493 or go to armstronggarden.com. • Prepare your citrus trees for a good harvest by using correct pruning techniques you can learn at a Sloat Garden Center seminar March 9 at either 10 a.m. at 401 Miller Ave. in Mill Valley (415-388-0365) or 2 p.m. at 2000 Novato Blvd. in Novato (415-897-2169). Attendance is limited and registration is required. Admission is $10, free for members. Go to sloatgardens.com. • Discover ways to preserve your fruits, herbs and vegetables through freezing, pickling, jamming or drying techniques taught during a one-evening class, "Easy Ways to Preserve Nature's Bounty," from 6:30 to 9 p.m. March 12 or April 30 at Indian Valley College at 1800 Ignacio Blvd. in Novato. The cost is $113 and includes an information booklet, recipes and take home samples. Call 415-457-8811 or register online at marincommunityed.com. • Design your own chicken coop, with built-in composting and a water-capturing roof, using free tips at a "GardenSmart: Reinventing the Chicken Coop" talk from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 23 at the Mill Valley Public Library at 375 Throckmorton Ave. in Mill Valley. Registration is recommended. Call 415-389-4292 or go to millvalleylibrary.org. PJ Bremier writes on home, garden, design and entertaining topics every Saturday and also on her blog at DesignSwirl.co. She may be contacted at P.O. Box 412, Kentfield 94914, or at pj@pjbremier.com.

Feb 28, 2019

A treasure in Kalispell, Bibler Gardens a geologist's wonderland and legacy - Great Falls Tribune

European antiques from grand homes, stained glass, antique Persian rugs, some historic French furniture, animal mounts, Inuit carvings and prints and 20th century Montana artists. The gardens, though, steal the show. Seven gardeners work for eight months a year to "paint" with flowers in a way that would do Bibler proud. Every fall they plant 10,000 to 14,000 bulbs, with 300,000 already in the ever-changing garden. By mid-May, seas of tulips emerge. Daffodils, hyacinths, alyssum, aubretia and candy tuft add to the scene. Apple, plum, pear and other flowering trees are in bloom. Perennials are emerging and getting ready to take over where the tulips leave off. Gardeners will plant another 30,000 annuals during the month of June.

Dec 14, 2018

Cal Poly's Rose Parade Float Will Be “Far Out” | Pasadena California, Hotels,CA Real Estate,Restaurants,City Guide... - Pasadena.com - Pasadena Now

Rose Float flower fields. "Students from all walks of life and fields of study do all of the welding, metal shaping, machining, foam carving, woodworking, painting and flower harvesting in this one-of-a-kind experience," Novell said. "We compete with professional float builders to win prestigious awards and have our work showcased before hundreds of thousands of spectators and an international television audience in the millions." Until the day of the parade, the nearly 100 student team members from both campuses will work nonstop to create an entry that inspires, impresses and ultimately wows Rose Float members, Cal Poly alumni, the judges and millions more around the globe. ...

Oct 26, 2018

Tropical Gardening: Protea flowers are a rare treat from Down Under

Protea family resemble no other flowers in the world. ADVERTISING One of the people responsible for Hawaii Proteas was Philip Parvin, horticulturist with the University of Hawaii's College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, who directed the Maui Experiment Station. When Parvin became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of Proteas that were planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with Proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a Protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow. With partial funding for Protea research coming from the Governor's Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry's problems and help improve production and handling. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning and plant nutrition. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in Protea production. Ronald Mau and Arnold Hara, entomologists, helped solve some of the pest problems, including those that could lead to the re...

Oct 26, 2018

Protea flowers a rare treat from down under

One of the people responsible for Hawaii proteas was Dr. Philip Parvin, horticulturist with the University of Hawaii's College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, who directed the Maui Experiment Station. ADVERTISING When Parvin first became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of proteas that had been planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow with partial funding for protea research coming from the Governor's Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry's problems and help improve production and handling. Dr. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning, and plant nutrition. Dr. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and to make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira, and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in protea production. Ronald Mau and Arnold Hara, entomolo...

Aug 17, 2018

Four Floral Businesses To Receive The Century Award In Palm Springs

SAF convention, we interact with business owners who have determination, vision and grit," said SAF Awards Committee Chairman Marvin Miller, Ph.D., AAF, of the Ball Horticultural Company in West Chicago, Illinois. "But to sustain that for 100 years or more is truly an impressive feat." City Line Florist Trumbull, Connecticut City Line Florist has been owned and operated by the Roehrich/Palazzo family since 1918. When Charles Roehrich returned home from World War I, he already had a family history in the floral industry; his grandfather had grown plants in greenhouses in Stratford, Connecticut, in the late 1800s. Charles borrowed a horse and wagon and sold flowering plants and cut flowers at the entrance of St. Michaels cemetery in Stratford, eventually opening up a storefront in Bridgeport, which sat on the city line of Stratford, leading to the name, City Line Florist. In 1975, Charles' son Bob and his grandchildren, Susan and Carl, decided to move to a new location in Trumbull, where they turned an old horse barn into a charming new florist shop. Bob received the Connecticut Florist of the Year Award in 2005. City Line, located in a quaint New England town of 30,000 people, has been voted "Best Florist in Fairfield County" for several consecutive years and won the 2018 Small Business Success Award in Trumbull. They're a top 100 member of Teleflora and have received the Connecticut Business & Industry Association Family Business Award. The business is very active in the local community with churches, schools and area organizations. They are dedicated participants in SAF's Petal It Forward campaign. Today, Nicole Palazzo represents the company's fouth generation, helping to run the shop alongside her mom and uncle, handling daily work and bringing the florist to a new l...