Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Arvin, CA

Find local Arvin, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Arvin and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Arvin Flower Shops

Arvin Flowers & Gifts

600 Tucker Street
Arvin, CA 93203
(661) 854-2329

Katrina's Bridal And Flower Shop

529 Bear Mountain Blvd
Arvin, CA 93203
(661) 854-4052

Arvin CA News

Oct 26, 2018

Tropical Gardening: Protea flowers are a rare treat from Down Under

Protea family resemble no other flowers in the world. ADVERTISING One of the people responsible for Hawaii Proteas was Philip Parvin, horticulturist with the University of Hawaii’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, who directed the Maui Experiment Station. When Parvin became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of Proteas that were planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with Proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a Protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow. With partial funding for Protea research coming from the Governor’s Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry’s problems and help improve production and handling. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning and plant nutrition. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in Protea production. Ronald Mau and Arnold Hara, entomologists, helped solve some of the pest problems, including those that co...

Oct 26, 2018

Protea flowers a rare treat from down under

One of the people responsible for Hawaii proteas was Dr. Philip Parvin, horticulturist with the University of Hawaii’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, who directed the Maui Experiment Station. ADVERTISING When Parvin first became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of proteas that had been planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow with partial funding for protea research coming from the Governor’s Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry’s problems and help improve production and handling. Dr. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning, and plant nutrition. Dr. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and to make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira, and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in protea production. Ronald Mau and Arn...

Aug 17, 2018

Four Floral Businesses To Receive The Century Award In Palm Springs

SAF convention, we interact with business owners who have determination, vision and grit," said SAF Awards Committee Chairman Marvin Miller, Ph.D., AAF, of the Ball Horticultural Company in West Chicago, Illinois. "But to sustain that for 100 years or more is truly an impressive feat." City Line Florist Trumbull, Connecticut City Line Florist has been owned and operated by the Roehrich/Palazzo family since 1918. When Charles Roehrich returned home from World War I, he already had a family history in the floral industry; his grandfather had grown plants in greenhouses in Stratford, Connecticut, in the late 1800s. Charles borrowed a horse and wagon and sold flowering plants and cut flowers at the entrance of St. Michaels cemetery in Stratford, eventually opening up a storefront in Bridgeport, which sat on the city line of Stratford, leading to the name, City Line Florist. In 1975, Charles' son Bob and his grandchildren, Susan and Carl, decided to move to a new location in Trumbull, where they turned an old horse barn into a charming new florist shop. Bob received the Connecticut Florist of the Year Award in 2005. City Line, located in a quaint New England town of 30,000 people, has been voted "Best Florist in Fairfield County" for several consecutive years and won the 2018 Small Business Success Award in Trumbull. They're a top 100 member of Teleflora and have received the Connecticut Business & Industry Association Family Business Award. The business is very active in the local community with churches, schools and area organizations. They are dedicated participants in SAF's Petal It Forward campaign. Today, Nicole Palazzo represents the company's fouth generation, helping to run the shop alongside her mom and uncle, handling daily work and bringing the florist to a new l...

Jul 26, 2018

The Perimeter Is Dead. Send Flowers.

Rome which led to the sack of the city by surrounding it and waiting them out. Eventually the Romans found themselves starving and out of supplies. They had little recourse but to relent and flung open the gates of the city to allow the barbarians to collect their spoils. This highlighted a simple problem: Castles don't scale. Much in the same way an attacker can launch a denial of service attack and starve an organization that still utilizes the older defensive strategy. There needs to be a concerted effort to adapt or perish as the modern landscape does not afford the luxury of the "business as usual" security position. In moving the security of the enterprise to a scalable architecture, this allows the organization to not only deal with attacks that can exhaust resources but, allow it to move towards the end game of zero trust. The problem we run into here is that what does zero trust mean to you? John Kindervag famously put the bow on the concept when he coined the phrase in 2010. But, the reality is that zero trust is a wrapper for security that we should have been doing all along. If you are working as a defender you need to ensure some fundamental building blocks are in place for your organization. Straight away, do you have a device inventory in your organization? If not, why not? It is somewhat problematic to try and defend assets when you don't know what you're protecting. Further to that end, are these aforementioned devices supposed to have access at all? Assume the worst if you're not sure as to what is allowed on the network. People will continually amaze and mystify defenders in the new and exciting ways they will co-opt the resources on the network to their own ends. More often than naught this is done with no sense of malice but, the law of unintended consequences is always at the ready. The third point to consider is how are the users who have access to your netw...

Jun 14, 2018

'Field Notes:' All About The Bitterroot, Montana's State Flower

One winter, there was no game to eat toward the end of the season, so an old grandmother cried for her starving people. The woman went up on a hill to ask the creator for mercy and protection, grieving over the plight of her people. Her tears ran down her silver hair and the sun turned her tears into the bitterroot flower, whose nutritious root provided the starving people with food. So when the bitterroots burst into bloom every spring, we can admire the silvery sheen of the puddles, and remember the old grandmother's hair and her prayer for her people. "Field Notes" is produced by the Montana Natural History Center. (Broadcast: "Field Notes," 6/03/18 and 6/8/18. Listen weekly on the radio, Sundays at 12:55 p.m., Tuesdays at 4:54 p.m., or Fridays at 4:54 p.m., or via podcast.) ...

May 24, 2018

The Outside Story: Mountain Laurel Is Special, In Bloom or Not

Mountain laurel also has the name spoonwood, and legend has it that Native Americans carved it for this purpose."It's lovely carving wood," Dustin says. "It's very stable, meaning it doesn't like to crack as much as some other woods. That makes for easier carving, because it can be carved green. It's white in color, strong and light and without any taste or perfume." He estimates that he's carved 20,000 spoons out of mountain laurel, and plenty from the wood of its relative, blueberry. Mountain laurel is lovely wherever you find it, but some of the larger stands are worth a planned visit. Timing of the bloom is affected by elevation and latitude, as well as spring temperatures: an unusually warm, sunny spring moves the flowering season earlier by one to two weeks. There are very large specimens at The Fells, also known as the Hay estate, on the banks of Lake Sunapee. New Hampshire's Russell-Abbott State Forest, Pisgah State Park, and Wontastaket State Forest have thick stands, as does Vermont's Black Mountain Natural Area. Maine's largest stand is in the Bijhouwer Forest in Phippsburg. Spectacular collections are found at Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain, Mass.Laurie D. Morrissey is a writer in Hopkinton, N.H. The illustration for this column was drawn by Adelaide Tyrol. The Outside Story is assigned and edited byNorthern Woodlandsmagazine: northernwoodlands.org, and sponsored by the Wellborn Ecology Fund of New Hampshire Charitable Foundation: wellborn@nhcf.org.