Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Alameda, CA

Find local Alameda, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Alameda and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Alameda Flower Shops

Alameda Floral Design

1908 Encinal Ave
Alameda, CA 94501
(510) 764-6787

South Shore Florist & Gifts

1311 Park St
Alameda, CA 94501
(510) 523-6655

Sunny Day Florist

1 Cerruti Ct
Alameda, CA 94501
(510) 986-1002

Alameda CA News

Apr 7, 2017

Big wildflower bloom expected in Bay Area parks as spring sunshine arrives

Alameda Creek. They described the early part of the wildflower season as a scavenger hunt, but said they spotted ample amounts of poppies during their hike.“Get out of your car,” said Ruland. “You are going to see stuff. Right here, there are four kinds of flowers,” she said, pointing to the ground. “They are small, but still beautiful.”Many parks are capitalizing on the public’s interest this year — not only because of the amazing photographs of the “Super Bloom” that filled Facebook, Instagram and Twitter from Anza Borrego, Joshua Tree, Antelope Valley and other Southern California desert parks, but also because the drought has Northern Californians longing for the vibrant spring displays.Wildflowers boom in the Middle Ridge Open Space in Tiburon on March 16, 2017. (Alan Dep/Marin Independent Journal) “Last I heard, we were at 25 or 26 inches for rainfall this winter,” said Duke Heberling, supervising ranger at Pacheco State Park east of Gilroy. “Our annual average is about 8 inches. We’re still very green out here.”Pacheco State Park, which hosted a wildflower day Saturday, has been barren and dry for most months back to 2012 — an arid landscape surrounding much of San Luis Reservoir. But as the reservoir filled up this winter — from 10 percent last August to 100 percent today — the hills have bloomed.“We had a pretty good year last year, and this year seems to be better,” Heberling said. “There’s a huge variety. There’s like an 80-acre field of yellow mustard. It’s just amazing.”Cindy Roessler, a biologist with the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, said some of the best places in the Peninsula and South Bay for wildflowers in the coming weeks will be the Woods Trail at Sierra Azul Open Space Preserve near Los Gatos, Skyline Ridge Open Space Preserve along Skyline Boulevard and Edgewood County Park and Natural Preserve in the hills of Redwood City.John Henderson and his wife, Rose, with camera in tow, were out at Edgewood last week, looking for the elusive purple mouse ears, a distinctive lilac-colored plant found in serpentine soils of California and Oregon.“It’s not a large bloom yet,” he said. “They’re just starting. But it’s a good year to be hopeful.”img class="lazyautosizes lazyload" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/sjm-wildflowers-0331-07.jpg?w=620&crop=0%2C0px%2C100%2C9999px" alt="Blue larkspurs bloom on Old Stage Road at Edgewood County Park and Natural Preserve in Redwood City, Calif., on Tuesday, March 28,... (The Mercury News)

Dec 2, 2016

Veterans Day across the US

Service members stand while being recognized during a Veterans Day ceremony on the hangar deck of the USS Hornet Museum Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in Alameda, Calif. The Essex-class carrier is known for its service in World War II and the recoveries of the Apollo 11 and 12 lunar capsules after astronauts walked on the moon. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) A wreath is tossed off the fantail of the USS Hornet Museum during a Veterans Day ceremony Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in Alameda, Calif. The Essex-class carrier is known for its service in World War II and the recoveries of the Apollo 11 and 12 lunar capsules after astronauts walked on the moon. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) WWII veteran Wallace Higgins, 91, a recipien... (Baltimore Sun)

Apr 28, 2016

Park It by Ned MacKay: May Day in the regional parks

Family Nature Fun Hour from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, April 30 and May 1 at Crab Cove Visitor Center in Alameda. You can find out which animals call the mud flats home as the tide goes out. Then it’s fish feeding time from 3 to 3:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday at the center’s aquarium. Crab Cove is at 1252 McKay Ave. off Central Avenue. For information, call 510-544-3187. * * * Ardenwood Historic Farm in Fremont has all kinds of programs recreating life on a 19th century farming estate. A unique feature is the horse-drawn railroad, which operates from 10:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. every Thursday, Friday and Sunday. Visitors can help feed the farm animals at 3 p.m. every Thursday through Sunday. There’s cooking in the country kitchen from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sundays, May 1 and 22, June 5 and 19. And during “Farm Moms” from 11 a.m. to noon on May Day, you can visit the hens, ewes and nanny goats to see how they care for their young. Ardenwood is located at 34600 Ardenwood Boulevard, just north of Highway 84. For more information on Ardenwood programs and fees, call 510-544-2797. * * * The Park District has resumed a shuttle service that takes hikers ages eight and older to the top of Pleasanton Ridge Regional Park in Pleasanton for hikes of varying length back to the entrance. Pleasanton Ridge has abundant wildlife and spectacular views of the tri-valley area. Shuttles are available at 8 a.m. on Saturdays, May 7 and 28, June 11 and 18. There are three destinations, resulting in hikes of 4.66, 7 or 9.22 miles back to the start. Registration is required and there is a $10 fee per person ($12 for non-district residents). For information and registration, call 888-327-2757 and select option 2. Tags: East Bay Regional Park District, May Day, Ned Mackay, Park It Category: Community Focus ... (Martinez News-Gazette)

Apr 28, 2016

East Bay's Park It: This May Day, craft, hike and more

Meet at the uppermost parking lot on Somersville Road, 3½ miles south of Highway 4. For information, call 888-327-2757, ext. 2750. Alameda: Low tide exploration is the theme of Family Nature Fun Hour from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturday and May 1 at Crab Cove Visitor Center in Alameda. You can find out which animals call the mud flats home as the tide goes out. Then it's fish feeding time from 3 to 3:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday at the center's aquarium. Crab Cove is at 1252 McKay Ave. off Central Avenue. For information, call 510-544-3187. Fremont: Ardenwood Historic Farm in Fremont has all kinds of programs recreating life on a 19th century farming estate. A unique feature is the railroad, which operates from 10:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. every Thursday, Friday and Sunday. Visitors can help feed the farm animals at 3 p.m. every Thursday through Sunday. There's cooking in the country kitchen from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sundays, May 1, May 22, June 5 and June 19. And during "Farm Moms" from 11 a.m. to noon on May Day, you can visit the hens, ewes and nanny goats to see how they care for their young. Ardenwood is at 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., just north of Highway 84. For more information on Ardenwood programs and fees, call 510-544-2797. Pleasanton: The Park District has resumed a shuttle service that takes hikers ages 8 and older to the top of Pleasanton Ridge Regional Park in Pleasanton for hikes of varying lengths back to the entrance. Pleasanton Ridge has abundant wildlife and spectacular views of the Tri-Valley. Shuttles are available at 8 a.m. on Saturdays, May 7, May 28, June 11 and June 18. There are three destinations, resulting in hikes of 4.66, 7 or 9.22 miles back to the start. Registration is required, and there is a $10 fee per person ($12 for nondistrict residents). For information and registration, call 888-327-2757 and select option 2. Ned MacKay writes a regular column about East Bay Regional Park District sites and activities. Email him at nedmackay@comcast.net. (Fremont Bulletin)

Apr 22, 2016

Durlynn Anema: California Native Daughters gather for tea and friendship

Her grandparents on her father’s side were from Calaveras and Placer Counties. Her mother had a grandmother from Alameda County with a grandfather coming to California from Montana. She enjoys visiting parlors and is impressed with how quickly the Zinfandel Parlor has grown. Maria Elena Serna was the hostess at my “Acampo” table. This term is used because Maria plus three other women were born and raised in Acampo, with two still residing there. All four attended Houston School and Lodi High School. Bonnie Cooper Abba met her husband at Lodi High when she was a freshman and he a senior. After they married she moved to his family’s acreage in Acampo. Pat Simpfenderfer still lives in the house where she was raised. I remembered her and her daughter Trina, who I taught while at Houston School. Doris Beck was raised in Acampo and attended the same schools but her life took a different turn. After high school she went to work at Supermold where she met her husband Ron Beck. He proposed and gave her an engagement ring at Lodi Lake during a lunch break. After their marriage they were transferred to Ohio where they lived for 30 years. When he retired they moved to Las Vegas for 21 years. Married for 60 years, Doris decided to move back to Lodi after Ron’s death and bought at the new Rose Garden development. Another Zinfandel member with a long California heritage is Corrine Terry. She was born and raised in San Francisco, graduated from Balboa High School, went to San Francisco City College and then University of California, Berkeley. She said her grandparents were Irish coming to the U. S. in the “Potato Famine” migration. This group went West. Like many other Irish, hers was a “cop” family in San Francisco. The Native Daughters of the Golden West is a fascinating group. More about their many projects later. Thank you, Maria, for your wonderful invitation. Have a good day and week. Contact? Email durlynnca@gmail.com. (Lodi News-Sentinel)

Apr 22, 2016

San Francisco Bay: Massive effort to remove aquatic invader nearly finished

Atlantic cordgrass, was planted in 1973 by the Army Corps of Engineers to control erosion and restore a marsh as part of a flood-control project at Alameda Creek in Fremont. But the plant, also known as Spartina alterniflora, spread in ways the Corps never expected, crossbreeding with native Pacific cordgrass, which grows shorter and less dense. The horticultural blitzkrieg reduced the amount of food and shelter for birds and other wildlife around the bay. Every year, thousands of birds, including avocets, terns, ducks, dowitchers and godwits, go to the bay's mud flats when the tide is out to forage for snails, shrimp, worms and other food. As the mud flats became thick meadows of invasive spartina, the birds had less food. Also, because of the plants' extensive root systems, the creatures that live in the mud and provide the food also were being forced out. Advertisement "It's biological pollution," said Marilyn Latta, manager of the invasive spartina project for the California Coastal Conservancy, a state agency based in Oakland. "The wetlands were at risk of becoming single monocultures." From kudzu vines that smother forests in the South to star thistle on Western rangelands, to Mediterranean fruit flies and Formosan termites, invasive species cost the United States an estimated $120 billion a year, according to a Cornell University study. In the Bay Area, scientists worried that left unchecked, the non-native cordgrass would ruin years of efforts and hundreds of millions of dollars spent to painstakingly restore wetlands and convert former industrial salt evaporation ponds back to natural marshes for ducks, fish, harbor seals and shorebirds. So in 2005, the conservancy launched a massive program to get rid of it. Working with more than 200 cities, counties and non-profit g... (San Jose Mercury News)