Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

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Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

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Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Prescott Flowers

Order flowers and gifts from Prescott Flowers located in Prescott AR for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 228 East Vine Street, Prescott Arkansas 71857 Zip. The phone number is (870) 887-3111. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Prescott Flowers in Prescott AR. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Prescott Flowers delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Prescott Flowers
Address:
228 East Vine Street
City:
Prescott
State:
Arkansas
Zip Code:
71857
Phone number:
(870) 887-3111
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Prescott Flowers directions to 228 East Vine Street in Prescott, AR (Zip 71857) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 33.79937, -93.380722 respectively.

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Flowers and Gifts News

Jul 5, 2019

12 annual flowers that thrive in full sunlight - The Daily Courier

Watters Garden Center. Ken Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Road in Prescott, or contacted through WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter.

Apr 27, 2019

Why flowers die, what to do to prevent it - Prescott Daily Courier

Mistake No. 3 Planting for the Wrong Region — New gardeners often bring cacti up from the desert of Phoenix for Prescott planting. All cacti will thrive until our first hard freeze around Thanksgiving when each plant will shrivel, freeze solid, and turn into a pile of black mush. Solution: Talk to the gardeners on your street for advice; you’ll know them by their beautiful gardens. Visit a local botanical garden to see what grows well in your region. Shop for plants locally, and ask your garden center for advice. Mistake No. 4 Planting Too Early — It’s not fair: Winter has hung on three weeks too long, and the nurseries are tempting you with all those beautiful dahlias and New Guinea impatiens. If the nursery is selling these flowers, it must be time to plant them, right? So you bring home a flat, and set out your newbies the first time the thermometer hits 60 degrees F. The problem with this approach is that the nursery was tending these tender tropicals in controlled-temp greenhouses, and now you’ve plopped them directly into the spring thaw. Not always death-proof to a sudden night time dip in temperature. Solution: Usually the last frost date is May 9. If the plant tag says to plant them two weeks after the last frost, do so or be ready to protect and cover each one every night if necessary. For the earliest spring flowers stick to stalwarts like pansies, dusty millers, snapdragons, and primroses. Mistake No. 5 Too Much (or Too Little) Water — Flowers are as particular about moisture as they are about sun exposure. “Moisture loving” may mean an inch of water per week, or it could describe a bog plant like our cardinal flower. Local natives are ready for planting at the garden center and blooming like crazy right now, but most of these mountain tough plants can literally be watered to death. Solution: Plant together flowers with similar needs. The landscape around your mailbox and far away from your faucet may be perfect for native xeriscape plants. Install moisture-loving plants in the garden bed by the downspouts. Again, for local inspiration take a look at the gardens Lisa and I planted. Some of my personal favorites are: Herbs — The entire family of herbs is easy to grow, but start with this list: Basil, Bay, Catmint, Chamomile, Lavender, Mint, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Scented Geranium, Thyme. Perennials — Astilbe, Dianthus, Daylily, Hosta, Iris, Lily, Lily-of-the-Valley, Peony, Phlox, Primrose, Russian Sage, Salvia, Sedum, Sweet Woodruff, Verbena. Annual Flowers — Alyssum, Candytuft, Geranium, Marigold, Nasturtium, Pansy, Petunia, Poppy, Primrose, Stock, and Violas. Until next issue, I’ll be here at Watters Garden Center helping gardeners with their flower successes. Ken Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Road in Prescott, or contacted online at WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter.

Apr 27, 2019

Why Flowers Die and What to Do to Prevent It - Prescott eNews

Mistake #3 Planting for the Wrong Region New gardeners often bring cacti up from the desert of Phoenix for Prescott planting. All cacti will thrive until our first hard freeze around Thanksgiving when each plant will shrivel, freeze solid, and turn into a pile of black mush. Solution: Talk to the gardeners on your street for advice; you'll know them by their beautiful gardens. Visit a local botanical garden to see what grows well in your region. Shop for plants locally, and ask your garden center for advice. Mistake #4 Planting Too Early It's not fair: Winter has hung on three weeks too long, and the nurseries are tempting you with all those beautiful dahlias and New Guinea impatiens. If the nursery is selling these flowers, it must be time to plant them, right? So you bring home a flat, and set out your newbies the first time the thermometer hits 60 degrees F.The problem with this approach is that the nursery was tending these tender tropicals in controlled-temp greenhouses, and now you've plopped them directly into the spring thaw. Not always death-proof to a sudden night time dip in temperature. Solution: Usually the last frost date is May 9th. If the plant tag says to plant them two weeks after the last frost, do so or be ready to protect and cover each one every night if necessary. For the earliest spring flowers stick to stalwarts like pansies, dusty millers, snapdragons, and primroses. Mistake #5 Too Much (or Too Little) Water Flowers are as particular about moisture as they are about sun exposure. “Moisture loving” may mean an inch of water per week, or it could describe a bog plant like our cardinal flower. Local natives are ready for planting at the garden center and blooming like crazy right now, but most of these mountain tough plants can literally be watered to death. Solution: Plant together flowers with similar needs. The landscape around your mailbox and far away from your faucet may be perfect for native xeriscape plants. Install moisture-loving plants in the garden bed by the downspouts. Again, for local inspiration take a look at the gardens Lisa and I planted. Some of my personal favorites are: Herbs - The entire family of herbs is easy to grow, but start with this list: Basil, Bay, Catmint, Chamomile, Lavender, Mint, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Scented Geranium, Thyme. Perennials – Astilbe, Dianthus, Daylily, Hosta, Iris, Lily, Lily-of-the-Valley, Peony, Phlox, Primrose, Russian Sage, Salvia, Sedum, Sweet Woodruff, Verbena. Definition of a Perennial. Annual Flowers – Alyssum, Candytuft, Geranium, Marigold, Nasturtium, Pansy, Petunia, Poppy, Primrose, Stock, and Violas. Definition of an Annual. Until next issue, I'll be here at Watters Garden Center helping gardeners with their flower successes. Ken Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Rd in Prescott, or contacted through her web site at WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter . ...

Apr 27, 2019

Mediterranean flowers that thrive locally - Prescott Daily Courier

Many Mediterranean plants thrive in the Prescott area, as both present the same challenges of growing flowers in regions that are beautiful yet harsh. Rocky soil, windswept mountain tops, and drought are a few of the conditions these 10 rugged Mediterranean flowers shrug off in local gardens. California Poppy seems to take over entire Arizona mountainsides. How can blooms with such ethereal beauty be so tough? This welcome harbinger of spring adds its vivid orange hue to any garden with ample sunshine and light soil. Although the plant is an annual, it self-seeds and every year the bluish-green foliage makes newly emerging seedlings easy to recognize. Crepe Myrtle, with its breathtaking flower colors, is a welcome sight during every garden’s late-summer lull. This is the perfect summer bloomer for gardens enhancing Prescott’s summer homes. With so many varieties available, it is popular to plant several of the different neon colors. Plant where you can enjoy a “close up” view of its beautiful multicolored bark and sinuous branches. Daphne is for the Mediterranean garden that receives shade from oak or cypress trees; the shrub is a flattering flowering companion to the...

Feb 28, 2019

10 romantic houseplants that say 'I Love You' - The Daily Courier

Day gifts here at Watters Garden Center. Ken Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Road in Prescott, or visit WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter.

Nov 28, 2018

Creative collaboration creates gift - The Daily Courier

We know a very talented glass artist - maybe a frame created just for the photo? We talked with Barbara Sussman of Prescott Valley, and her answer was, "Sure, I can do something." So, off to Barbara's glass studio we went with our photo in hand. Barbara found the perfect color to complement those in the picture, bringing in the blue hues of the ocean, sky, and the granddaughter's dress. Okay, that was step one, but we were still not part of the event. The Frame and I and Ida Kendall was our next stop - of course, she could put the grandparents into the photo! After a few visits to both Barbara and Ida, and their visits with each other, the photo was perfect and the glass frame had some more colors added to the corners - beautiful! Now, how to put it all together with a mat and backing - oh, no, you can't put hangers on the glass frame! Well, The Frame and I, experts that they are, figured it out, came up with the most beautiful final product including a mat that had an inner blue edge and a narrow wooden frame that brought together the flower colors. A few weeks later, we presented the gift, and as they opened it, we can still hear the screaming and see their delighted smiles! We are so fortunate to have access to such talent right here in Prescott and Prescott Valley. Thank you, Barbara Sussman, Ida Kendall and The Frame and I. - Paul and Shirley Baskin, Prescott Valley ...

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