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Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

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Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

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Florists in Butler, AL

Find local Butler, Alabama florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Butler and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Butler Flower Shops

Butler AL News

Jul 5, 2019

Budding hemp industry holds its breath over potential flower ban - Mountain Xpress

There are also 601 registered processors. That’s why Asheville-based activists Blake Butler and Rod Kight are making their voices heard on behalf of the farmers, processors and consumers whom they maintain have greatly benefited from the state’s burgeoning hemp industry. Butler is executive director of the N.C. Industrial Hemp Association, a nonprofit trade group. He says he’s driven from Asheville to Raleigh at least eight times in June alone to meet with state legislators about the potential ban on smokable hemp. Kight, an attorney, runs a legal blog called Kight on Cannabis. “All we’re trying to do is help the North Carolina farmer,” says Butler. “We want that famer to be recognized for growing a crop. It’s been legal in the state for three years under the pilot program, and smokable flower makes up about one-third of that industry. For law enforcement to come in on the back end — our question is, where have they been?” Although a May 23 draft of the farm bill called for the SBI’s requested ban on smokable hemp to take effect as soon as Dec. 1, 2019, the version which was passed by the Senate delays the ban until Dec. 1, 2020. In addition, the bill instructs the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the Hemp Association, the Hemp Commission, the SBI and any other law enforcement agencies and district attorneys the SBI wishes to include, to “meet at least quarterly to discuss best practices for the hemp industry.” The last-minute shift, which buys critical time for the industry, seems to be due largely to Butler’s advocacy efforts since he was hired as the Hemp Association’s executive director in mid-January. During his frequent trips to Raleigh, Butler says he’s met one-on-one with the SBI, sheriffs, district attorneys and legislative leaders. All of them, he reports — including Sen. Brent Jackson, an author of the bill — have been receptive. “We know the technology is there for a reliable field test,” Butler maintains. “The DEA now has a list of vendors they could recommend. My goal is to get a reliable field test in the hands of the SBI within three months.” But for Butler, there’s a bigger issue at stake. “All the concerns the SBI brought up, we can address, but we definitely cannot be categorized as an industry that is going to break the law,” he cont...

Apr 27, 2019

Wild for flowers: Spring blooming season finally arrives in Pittsburgh region - Tribune-Review

Fallingwater, near Ohiopyle, Fayette • Flight 93 National Memorial, Stonycreek, Somerset • Wolf Creek Narrows Natural Area, near Slippery Rock, Butler • Mingo Creek County Park, near Finleyville, Washington Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Renatta at 724-837-5374, rsignorini@tribweb.com or via Twitter . Wildflower Walk• May 3 and 10, 6-8 p.m.• In the Laurel Highlands area• Registration is required with Rachael Mahony at 724-259-2201 or rmahony@pa.gov TribLIVE's Daily and Weekly email newsletters deliver the news you want and information you need, right to your inbox. More Westmoreland Stories ...

Mar 15, 2019

Teen Cited After Phony Flower Sale At Doylestown CVS: Police - Doylestown, PA Patch

Hospital. Feb. 17 A 19-year-old Willow Grove man was arrested on suspicion of DUI following a traffic stop at approximately 2:30 a.m. on E. Butler Avenue in New Britain. He was stopped for non-functioning rear lighting and presented with an odor of alcoholic beverage. Field sobriety tests were administered and blood draw was taken at Doylestown Hospital. Feb. 14 Fraters Electric on Union Street in Doylestown reported $500 worth of damage to their business sign.Get the Doylestown newsletterSubscribe ...

Nov 28, 2018

William and Kate say it with flowers in tribute to Leicester City chief - Somerset County Gazette

Leicester City season ticket holder Kev Butler, 51, said: "There are clubs with load and loads of money but it's not about money, it's about how you treat the fans, how you look after the fans, so these people have been superb." He and former colleague Paul Groves, 67, showed the duchess their commemorative black and white scarves, which read Mr Chairman. Mr Butler said about Kate: "She was just sharing the compassion with everyone. "She seemed to feel it, she looked quite emotional, she felt what we were feeling." Leicester City season ticket holder Fiona Sturgess, 48, revealed Prince George had thought his father might be playing football during his trip to Leicester. Ms Sturgess was among the volunteers, invited to meet the royal couple, who had supported their club in the aftermath of the helicopter crash. After speaking to the duchess, who wore a Catherine Walker coat, the football fan added: "Kate said that William was playing football with the children last night and one of them said, I think it was George, ‘Are you playing football tomorrow, Pops?'" Mimicking the duchess's eyebrow raise, she added: "She said ‘no!'" Before leaving the King Power stadium the duke and duchess were given Leicester City tops for their children, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and baby Prince Louis. William, an avid Aston Villa fan, joked "They'll be fighting over the Leicester and Aston Villa kits".

Sep 10, 2018

The Difference Between Deadheading Or Cutting Back Flowers

PM Joe Lyons Local News Firearms belonging to the Village of Crestline were found in the home of Crestline Police Chief Joseph Butler, according to a report received from the Crawford County Sheriff's Office.� ...

Jul 26, 2018

Invasive plant a toxic 'horror'

Powers said. Of the 500 reported locations since the 1990s, only 40 are now considered active, she said. Sites have been reported in Berks, Butler, Carbon, Centre, Chester, Crawford, Erie, Huntingdon, McKean, Venango and Warren counties. Ford remembers the discovery of giant hogweed in Blair County, as well. “It has shown up here in the past,” he said, recalling a particular case in the Bellwood area. “I think it’s still rare to run into it.” Viral attention In the last week of June and first week of July, the term giant hogweed was near viral, as news organizations, national and local, published stories about the plant. The New York Times, Scientific American and Good Housekeeping were among them. The attention, Powers said, likely stems from the recent discovery of giant hogweed for the first time in Virginia. According to Scientific American, giant hogweed has now been found growing in 12 states. The news of a Virginia sighting — coupled with the severity of injuries that can be caused by physical contact with the plant — created a situation ripe for social media attention, Ford said. Searches for the term “giant hogweed” on social media platforms like Twitter show dozens, if not hundreds, of users posting photos of the plant and linking to articles while warning “do no touch.” “Social media drove it,” Ford said of the ongoing story of giant hogweed. But that is a good thing, he said. Getting information out about toxic or harmful plants is a good way to prevent injuries or even deaths, Ford said. Ford specifically referenced stories about children who were killed because they used hollow stalks of poison hemlock as whistles, and foragers who mistook young giant hogweed for wild carrot tops. Because of those cases, Ford said he welcomes ongoing media attention. “I think it’s a good thing because it keeps you aware,” he said. If you suspect giant hogweed – Call 1-877-464-9333 – Email RA-plant@pa.gov -- ...