Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Anchorage, AK

Find local Anchorage, Alaska florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Anchorage and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Anchorage Flower Shops

Alaska Flower Shop

3701 E Tudor Rd
Anchorage, AK 99507
(907) 561-5277

Anchorage Floral

3934 Spenard Road
Anchorage, AK 99517
(907) 243-1000

Basket Case Gift Baskets Flowers & Balloons

620 Jack St
Anchorage, AK 99515
(907) 349-1501

Bloomsbury Blooms

706 W 4Th Ave
Anchorage, AK 99501
(907) 350-7536

Carrs Floral Expressions

7731 E Northern Lights Blvd
Anchorage, AK 99504
(907) 339-1700

Chapel Of Love Florist

1001 Boniface Parkway
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 337-3051

Evalyn's Floral

343 W. Benson Blvd. #7
Anchorage, AK 99503
(907) 561-7322

Fine Flowers, Inc.

601 W 36Th Ave Ste 13
Anchorage, AK 99503
(907) 646-4000

Floral Expressions

1501 Huffman Park Dr
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 339-1370

Floral Expressions By Carrs

3101 Penland Parkway
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 339-5270

Flower Deliver

921 West 6Th Avenue
Anchorage, AK 99508
(866) 683-5224

Kristine's Flowers & Catering

7536 Lake Otis Parkway
Anchorage, AK 99507
(907) 336-2673

Mylord's Floral

7550 Old Seward Hwy Ste 110
Anchorage, AK 99518
(907) 522-2535

Orchid Man

3421 East Tudor Road
Anchorage, AK 99507
(907) 562-0077

Rose Garden & Balloon Arts

5121 Arctic Blvd Unit C
Anchorage, AK 99503
(907) 563-5515

Uptown Blossoms

242 W 34Th Ave
Anchorage, AK 99503
(907) 561-7673

Anchorage AK News

Sep 22, 2017

There was a parking spot, now it's all covered with flowers

Last Friday you may have noticed something unusual but uniquely cool going on downtown.During business hours, spread across various locations, Anchorage’s parking authority, EasyPark, along with artists, activists, and neighborhood organizations came together to allow other local businesses and organizations to temporarily transform metered parking spots into greener "Park(ing)" spaces.It was Park(ing) Day in Anchorage, where parking spots became miniature public pieces of land  for people to socialize.Park(ing) Day provides a surprising opportunity for healthy community engagement in a place that you would not normally find it. The city of Anchorage has been fully supporting the idea and encouraged people to visit each space through completing the "Park(ing) Day Passport” that was being handed out.EasyPark also encouraged that everyone who completed the passport and handed it into the Parks and Recreation Department at City Hall by 4 p.m., would receive fun "EasyPark Swag." EasyPark has been an advocate for Park(ing) Day and is one of the many partners in making the event happen each year.Anchorage started participating... (Anchorage Press)

Feb 9, 2017

Snowy day a challenge for 719 Boulder finishers

Gregg, 32, of Minneapolis, Minn. (1.33:43) in a two-man sprint to the line.      Talbot is a 2015 Dartmouth engineering graduate originally from Anchorage, Ak. and Gregg, from Winthrop, Wash. was a University of Alaska All-American before becoming a 2014 U.S. Olympian. Talbot’s top time was 16:29 slower than Nick Hendrickson’s 2016 win.      Allison said, “The racers were so whipped. The top guys were just tapped, so different from last year. Same with the Elite Women, who started their race in the snow.      “But you know what meant the most to me? The last woman coming to the finish (Gloria Ploss, 71, of Bend, Ore. in 4.51:52). We were just rolling up the finish when she came in, followed by Sean Petersen, who for years has cleared the course and skied in with the final Boulder Tour finisher.      “The look on her face was incredible. She felt so proud of herself. It brought a tear to my eye and reminded me what this race is all about.      “It was awesome. We did a lot of improvising with the wet conditions, but I’m just happy we pulled it off.”      Repeating as Boulder women’s winner in 1.40:19, 16:24 slower than last year, was Caitlin Gregg, 36, a 2010 Olympian from Minnesota. Just one year ago, after winning the Boulder, Gregg captured the World Championship bronze medal in 10k freestyle in Sweden.      Nate Struebel of Driggs, Idaho and the Teton Valley Ski Foundation won the Half Boulder in 47:39, and Dartmouth College senior Natalie Flowers of Belgrade, Mt. was the top Half Boulder woman, 52:04.      Ketchum’s Charley French, 90, won his age class and placed 115th overall in the Half Boulder, the 43rd man, in 1.29:55.      Local women on the Full Boulder age-class podium were June Lane, Carol Monteverde, Linda McClatchy, Kim Nalen, Elizabeth Youngman, Deb Cornwell, Muffy Ritz, Liv Jensen, Laura Theis, Mary Rose, Alexa Turzian, Deedra Irwin and Annie Pokorny.      Full Boulder male podium placers from the valley were Del Pletcher, Patrick Simpson, Jon Engen, Bill Nurge, John Reuter, Rogan Brown, Cole Morgan, Sebastian Radl-Jones, Fisher Gardner and Mathias Radl-Jones.      Prize money for the 2017 Boulder Tour was $9,150 with $2,500 going to the male and female winners. Second place finishers earned $1,000 and third placers $500. There was $400 in preem money, plus $750 for male and female winners of five separate waves.      You have to go back to February 1985 to find slower Boulder Tour finishing times, again, because of heavy snow.      That year, the Wood River Valley had near-drought conditions for the month of January and most of December before 20 inches of snow dumped between Thursday and Friday, before the scheduled running of the Boulder Ski Tour.      Moisture content of that 24-hour storm was two-and-a-half inches, matching the normal total of all of February.      Local cross-country skiers comprised most of the Boulder Ski Tour field in those days, compared to all the out-of-town participants today. The first solution that organizers came up with was pushing the race start back one day to Sunday.     It enabled groomer Brad Siemer helped by Nordic enthusiasts like John Plummer and Dave Wheelock to work 36 hours clearing the course.      Unfortunate... (Idaho Mountain Express and Guide)

Feb 9, 2017

Master gardener training offered in Fairbanks

Fairbanks Cooperative Extension district office at 724 27th Ave. Longtime Extension horticulture agent Julie Riley, who taught master gardening in Anchorage for 30 years, will lead the class, which will also feature other agents and guest instructors. Riley is based in Fairbanks now. Participants will receive 40 hours of instruction on horticultural topics, including botany, soils, vegetable and fruit production, growing organically, flowers, trees, shrubs, plant diseases, integrated pest management, weed control, and greenhouse construction and heating. After completing the course, master gardeners contribute 40 hours of volunteer service to their communities. A $300 fee includes materials and an Alaska gardening manual. A limited number of tuition waivers are available for those with financial need. Individuals may register online or at the district office, in the Fairbanks Community Food Bank Building. (Fairbanks Daily News-Miner)

Nov 9, 2016

Conway Master Gardener receives local, state honors

Stansel retired a few years ago after 20 years as a supervisory U.S. probation officer in Little Rock. She grew up in Georgia but was born in Anchorage, Alaska. “My dad was in the Air Force, and we moved all around,” she said. She graduated from Northside High School in Warner Robbins, Georgia, and from Valdosta State College (now Valdosta State University) with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. She met her husband, Steve Stansel, while in Valdosta. He is retired from the U.S. Border Patrol and is now a corporate pilot for Koontz Electric Co. in Morrilton. The Stansels were married in 1978 and have one son, Jon-Stephen, 35. Jon-Stephen and his wife, Annie, are expecting a baby boy soon. They live in San Marcos, Texas, where he is the social-media coordinator at Texas State University. Debra Stansel grows a wide variety of plants and flowers in her backyard. When asked what her favorite flower is, she said, “I love all flowers, but maybe because we’re expecting our first grandchild, I’ll have to say the daffodil — the Sir Winston Churchill Daffodil. “Jon-Stephen and Annie are naming their son Winston, after Winston Churchill,” she said, smiling. “I have 193 different varieties of daffodils out there,” she said, pointing to her backyard. “I was recently going through a magazine and discovered the Sir Winston Churchill Daffodil. I’ve ordered 150 of those daffodils and will share some with Annie and Jon-Stephen.” Debra Stansel is also a beekeeper and is a charter member of the Lady Beekeepers of Arkansas. She does not maintain her beehives in her backyard, however, because the family now has a dog, a beagle named Luna. “Luna rules over the house and the yard,” Stansel said, laughing. “She helps me in the garden — she digs two holes, and I dig one. “Our yard has to be dog friendly. I don’t use any pesticides, nor do I plant anything that might harm the dog. I used to have the honeybees out there, but we moved them after we got Luna, who is really Jon-Stephen’s dog, but he couldn’t keep her when he moved to Texas, so we have her now. She goes with us to visit them every four or five weeks.” Stansel also enjoys making pottery and incorporates some of her creations into her flower gardens. She works on her ceramics at the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock. “I have a sensory garden,” she told visitors as they walked through her backyard. “I plant things like rosemary, lemon and thyme for fragrance. For texture, I have lamb’s ear. For sight, I have big elephant ears and the little ceramic gnomes that I have made. “I also have an azalea garden. They are all one color — fuchsia. I did that to honor Valdosta, [Georgia], which is called The Azalea City.” ... (Arkansas Online)

Jul 5, 2016

Field of floral dreams

Fluetsch explained. From there, they’ll go to the airport and flown on a midnight FedEx flight to Anchorage where they’ll be distributed down south. For the lesser quality stems, Fluetsch said he’s hoping to sell to local bed and breakfast businesses. The peonies are planted in rows of raised beds, a mixture of dirt that was at the site and sand, covered in black plastic. By 2019, each of the original 300 plants could produce 10 stems. “I expect to see a solid row of green with big pink balls sticking up,” Fluetsch said. Until then, he’s been cutting the blooms off to make sure all the energy goes back to the roots. After the planting of 600 more roots this fall, Rainforest Peonies could have up to 9,000 stems in 2020. “If we doubled this planting area, that means we’ll have 1,800 plants and 18,000 stems,” he said. At this point, Fluetsch is targeting 3,000 plants per acre, which is a conservative amount; other farms have upwards of double that per acre. With six acres logged, there’s still plenty of potential left. He said he wants to also start growing white peonies, which fetch more money on the market. While a multi-year wait for peonies to become marketable may seem long, Fluetsch is a patient man. “You plant it, you wait your five years and then you have an annuity,” he said. And Fluetsch isn’t worried about the demand going away. “As long as there are weddings, I have a market.” • Contact reporter Lisa Phu at 523-2246 and lisa.phu@juneauempire.com. (Juneau Empire (subscription))

May 3, 2016

Local Restaurants Serving Mother's Day Brunch

A smattering of local restaurants (listed alphabetically) offering Mother’s Day brunch on May 8. Make your reservation now. The Anchorage: Brunch includes breakfast and lunch items. Dessert station, appetizer buffet, and kids’ items. Call 414-431-3554. 4700 N. Port Washington Rd. All Purpose: Plates include smoked salmon hash, flat-iron steak with roasted fingerling potatoes, and vanilla French toast with champagne berry coulis. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Call 414-672-6000 for a reservation. 814 S. Second St. Boerner Botanical Gardens: Take mom to get a great view of the spring flowers in bloom and a brunch spread that will be just as colorful. Enjoy a vast array of exquisite entrees, breakfast classics, and mini-desserts, plus made-to-order omelets and build-your-own bloody marys. Reservations are required and service runs from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 9400 Boerner Drive, Hales Corners.  (JP) Café Calatrava: For the art appreciator, the Milwaukee Art Museum’s café is offering cuisine fit for a canvas and a view of Lake Michigan to match. Plus, all meals come with a complimentary mimosa to celebrate mothers everywhere. Becau... (Milwaukee Magazine)